noncoercive

noncoercive

(ˌnɒnkəʊˈɜːsɪv)
adj
not coercive
References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, blackmail fits into the category of peaceable, noncoercive voluntary exchange, just like most other transactions.
It is thus entirely plausible that new legislation imposing a milder penalty--say 10 percent to 15 percent of federal funding--could be classified as noncoercive.
Soft power is the concept that Harvard University professor Joseph Nye developed to describe the noncoercive ability to shape the preferences of others through the attractiveness of culture, political values, and foreign policies.
That undermines his argument that nudging is a noncoercive tool of government and gives ammunition to his opponents who fear the "sinister" application of nudging.
According to Reveron: "Presidents of all political persuasions continue to use the military as a preferred tool of national power in noncoercive ways" (48).
There are many feasible, educationally advantageous, and potentially popular remedies that are noncoercive and could improve conditions.
That said, both noncoercive and coercive incentive strategies exist and have been deployed by third parties in a variety of conflict situations.
Private governance replaces threats of coercion with numerous noncoercive mechanisms that expand the scope of trade, and it should be seen as one of the most successful peace projects in the history of the world.
Bordin (1994) described the alliance between the client and the counselor as a process based on mutuality and respect, emphasizing the use of noncoercive approaches to change.
Government wields fearsome coercive power to control and restrict, as well as the noncoercive power of tremendous size and hence tremendous influence and dependency.
It is only human to release a mother so she can raise her child in a noncoercive environment," Palabay said.
Yashar Saghai focuses on the final part of my commentary, where I argue that, precisely for being noncoercive, nudges occasionally cause deep shame.