noncollege

noncollege

(ˌnɒnˈkɒlɪdʒ)
adj
not related to a college or university
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants in the symbolic intergroup threat condition read an article entitled College students are much more selfish than noncollege students.
Fifty-eight percent of all babies born to noncollege women are born out of wedlock.
In this study, the isolates in the college women and noncollege women were identified as Escherichia coli (9 and 16), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 and 5), Enterococcus faecalis (5 and 2), and Staphylococcus aureus (2 and 1).
Autor identifies three mechanisms through which the drop in wages for noncollege workers has occurred.
More than 13% of young adults not in college report daily, or near daily, marijuana use; alcohol use is more common among college students; some opioid use is declining in both groups; and the most-sizable difference is the higher rate of cigarette smoking in the noncollege group --so says the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Bethesda, Md., which has announced the latest Monitoring the Future survey results on substance use trends.
Second, the use of college students, who in this study were mostly Caucasian females of middle to upper socioeconomic status, excludes other young people, such as those from lower income brackets, varied ethnicities, and noncollege emerging adults.
The consequences of the Tax Act for core public services is concern number one for women (67 percent), white voters (62 percent), voters over age 50 (65 percent), and noncollege white women (74 percent).
Young adults in college are more likely to binge drink man their noncollege peers, though the differences are narrowing.
A small (4% -5%) decline in food expenditures is estimated, particularly in the noncollege education group.
This article then reviews other evidence at the local level that implies immigration is not associated with wage declines for noncollege workers, even if they are high school dropouts.
The contribution of noncollege labor to real value-added growth during the postrecession period turned up after decreasing during the 1998-2007 period.
Not by Hispanics in the Sun Belt or young techies in newly fashionable gentrified neighborhoods in Silicon Valley, Brooklyn, or Austin, but by white noncollege graduates in the counties outside million-plus metropolitan areas in the Midwest.