noncombat

noncombat

(ˌnɒnˈkɒmbæt)
adj
(Military) not involved in or intended for combat
References in periodicals archive ?
'Donor countries' would be allowed to provide funding, but only for the noncombat needs of the rebels, the source said.
By comparison, in more than 16 years in Afghanistan, the United States has so far lost 2,356 troops to both combat and noncombat causes.
Brian Steel Wills (professor of history, Kennesaw State University) presents Inglorious Passage: Noncombat Deaths in the American Civil War, a scholarly study drawing upon letters, diaries, obituaries, and more primary sources to examine a rarely discussed phenomenon of the American Civil War--mortality from noncombat deaths.
Wittily dark and uncompromising in its skewering of mandatory service time, Zero Motivation was, as put best by Amos Barshad, "the Best (Israeli Army) (Apolitical) (Noncombat) (Black) Comedy of the Year." Now, it's set to be introduced to a wider English-speaking audience.
The majority of patients in Afghanistan were due to noncombat related trauma and medical/congenital conditions.
This study of the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars demonstrates the effect of daily life details, such as illness and noncombat deaths of men and horses, on the outcomes of military campaigns.
recruited women for noncombat work to free up men for combat duty (see p.
Their mission was to fly noncombat missions to free up male pilots to fly overseas.
Ray Odierno said in BaghdadAathat most of theAa96,000 soldiers currently in Iraq will remain there through May, when the military will start scaling down to 50,000 noncombat troops by the Obama administration's deadline at the start of September.
" Though women were inducted in the armed forces in 1992, a conscious attempt was made to keep them in noncombat roles," he said.
However, during a delay period before the cognitive memory challenge, participants were shown random images of combat or noncombat (neutral) scenes.
However, during a delay period before the cognitive memory challenge, subjects were shown random images of combat or noncombat (neutral) scenes.