nonconscious

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nonconscious

(ˌnɒnˈkɒnʃəs)
adj
relating to mental activity that is not consciousrelating to the absence of consciousness in inanimate objects
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nonconscious - concerning mental functioning that is not represented in consciousness; "nonconscious psychic processes"
unconscious - not conscious; lacking awareness and the capacity for sensory perception as if asleep or dead; "lay unconscious on the floor"
2.nonconscious - relating to the lack of consciousness of inanimate things
nonliving, non-living, inanimate - not endowed with life; "the inorganic world is inanimate"; "inanimate objects"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is well accepted that not only simple and basic responses can be primed, but even extremely complex cognitive processes can be affected nonconsciously through priming, such as goal activation (Marien, Custers, Hassin & Aarts, 2012), observed and simulated responses from others (Smith & Mackie, 2014), and, the focus of the present study, judgment and stereotypes (Allen, Sherman & Klauer, 2010; Rubinstein & Brenner, 2014).
In other words, we operate mostly on autopilot where emotional reactions, beliefs, and even painful past experiences nonconsciously frame situations and steer actions.
The Effects of Nonconsciously Priming Emotion Concepts on Behavior.
Instead, what people register nonconsciously and what they consciously choose to focus on are the experiential opportunities offered by a place's affordances."
negatively and nonconsciously affect behavior towards blacks.").
The brain systems that control behavioural responses in threatening situations are similar in rodents and humans, and involve older areas deep in the brain that work nonconsciously (for example, the amygdala).
When individuals are made aware of the effects of priming stimuli they engage in correction, consciously or nonconsciously (Strack, Schwarz, Bless, Kubler, & Wanke, 1993).
As noted by the authors, many lines of investigation have converged in recent years to frame the nature and problem of consciousness; studies of perceptual priming where the main effect is mediated nonconsciously; studies of reversible figures (for example, Necker's cube) in which the visual experience is altered without any direct and conscious effort by the percipient; studies of hallucinatory experiences, of dreams, of stimulus saliency.
Different fields of activities arise from "times" spent in the exploration (usually nonconsciously in terms of structures) of different structures: engineers deal with structures involving machinery, material, forces, etc.; physicians deal with the chemical, physiological, and other structures constituting the human body.
Hence, both terms seem particularly useful to account for what neuroscientists call "implicit memory." Unlike explicit memory, which may be defined as the intentional or conscious recollection of something, implicit memory is said to be at work when information previously acquired is used unintentionally or nonconsciously (Schacter and Tulving, 1994), especially for performing automated tasks like riding a bicycle or playing the piano effortlessly (Schacter, 1996).