noncultivated

noncultivated

(ˌnɒnˈkʌltɪˌveɪtɪd)
adj
relating to natural resources that are not under institutional or managed cultivation
References in periodicals archive ?
(2014) Ecological characterization of white grubs (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae) community in cultivated and noncultivated fields.
provided freely from the environment that is, from noncultivated
Class 2 are commercially valuable but noncultivated species, which in BEL are blue mussels and cockles, with a total estimated potential annual harvest of 800 and 1,500 t, respectively.
Dmitrieva, "New approach to cryopreservation of primary noncultivated human umbilical vein endothelium in biobanking," Biopreservation and Biobanking, vol.
Tractor rows also may be planted to a leguminous or grass cover crop, or allowed to self-seed with noncultivated vegetation, and they may be tilled or mowed with varying frequency.
In Bullen district of Benshanguel-Gumez region, the noncultivated plants provide considerable amount of supplementary food and have significant contribution to generating additional income for many households.
Noncultivated bacteria identified by bacterial DNA have expanded the means for studying the systemic effect of oral infections [9].
Transplantation of primary (noncultivated) hepatocytes via portal vein proved effective in some animal liver disease models (reviewed in [110, 111]) and treatment ofhuman liver metabolic and genetic disorders like hepatolenticular degeneration (Wilson-Konovalov disease), tyrosinemia, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, urea cycle disorders, severe dyslipidemia, and others (reviewed in [112, 113]).
Furthermore, because weed control usually bypasses border vegetation, the sunny margins of these noncultivated lands can be recruited for the reintroduction of native wildflowers.
MANILA -- The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has approved a loan of $42.9 million to provide reliable irrigation for farmlands and noncultivated lands in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) in Pakistan.
Nebraska's land use is currently dominated by range and pasture (percent of state area; 50%) and cropland (i.e., cultivated, noncultivated; 39%; Nebraska National Resources Inventory, 2007).
These microalgae are beneficial as they are capable of all year production [9]; they grow in aqueous media and hence need less water than terrestrial crops [10]; microalgae can be cultivated in brackish water on noncultivated land [11] and they have rapid growth potential and have oil content up to 20-50% dry weight of biomass [12, 13].