nondepressed

nondepressed

(ˌnɒndɪˈprɛst)
adj
(esp of an emotional state) not depressed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The investigators led by Mayowa Olusunmade, MD, MPH, of New Jersey Medical School, Newark, found that, compared with those among nondepressed pediatric patients, hospitalization costs were $2,961 higher (P less than .001), length of stay was 0.89 days longer (P less than .001), and odds of death as an outcome while hospitalized was 1.77 times higher (P = .013) among depressed pediatric patients.
However the adolescents who had both JIA and depression at entry continued to have significantly more pain and disability at follow-up than did the nondepressed JIA patients, suggesting a link between depression and refractory pain and disability in JIA patients, the researchers reported.
On the basis of their two PHQ-9 scores, all patients were classified into one of four groups: The "nondepressed" group of 3,286 patients had a score of 9 or less on both occasions; the "remained depressed" cohort of 1,987 patients scored 10 or more on both PHQ-9s; the "no longer depressed" group of 1,542 patients scored at least 10 but subsequently improved by at least 5 points to a score of 9 or less; and the 735 patients in the "became depressed" group first scored 9 or less on the PHQ-9 but subsequently had at least a 5-point increase to a score of 10 or more.
Patients with cancer and depression have significantly more emergency and non-emergency visits and are more likely to be hospitalized as well as rehospitalized within 30 days than nondepressed cancer patients, suggesting that active treatment of depression in cancer patients can pay off in both better patient care and lower costs, reported Brent Mausbach, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist at the University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Center.
However, among women with an intended pregnancy, depressed mothers return to paid work more quickly than nondepressed mothers.
In patients with chronic diseases, depression has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, when compared to nondepressed patients [12,13].
Among nondepressed people, patterns were pretty predictable.
Effect of medroxyprogesterone on depressive symptoms in depressed and nondepressed perimenopausal and postmenopausal women after discontinuation of transdermal estradiol therapy.
All subjects were free of psychotropic medications, medically healthy, nondepressed, and substance free.
Three hypotheses were tested: (1) Depressed mothers are more likely to demonstrate harsh parenting than are nondepressed mothers; (2) depressed mothers are more likely to demonstrate neglectful parenting than are nondepressed mothers; and (3) depressed mothers are more likely to demonstrate emotional maltreatment than are nondepressed mothers.
A total of 44% of patients were classified as nondepressed, with a CES-D score of less than 16 at all time points, while 19% were considered depressed, with a score of 16 or above at all time points.
More than 80% of the depressed patients died or were hospitalized, compared with 43% of nondepressed patients.