nondescriptive

nondescriptive

(ˌnɒndɪˈskrɪptɪv)
adj
lacking description or not descriptive
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(22) The endoscopic appearance of pancreatic heterotopia is that of a small nondescriptive nodule covered by normal duodenal mucosa, often with central umbilication corresponding to the opening of the main duct.
However, the principles add little to the mission command process because they are used in nondescriptive ways that add nothing useful to the commander's intent, which subordinates use to exercise disciplined initiative.
"It has brought a lot of joy with beautiful paintings that brighten up a very nondescriptive office."
Smith and Wesson); (2) combining a nondescriptive, distinctive word with a surname; (3) avoiding the use of apostrophes, which the Board recently has used to affirm surname refusals; (4) using your first name or initials with your last name;[5] and/or (5) including a design component.
The absorption spectrum also showed some nondescriptive absorption in the near-IR region, which is characteristic of covellite CuS.
Participants rated how well items describe them on a 7-point scale (-3 = very uncharacteristic of me, extremely nondescriptive, to + 3 = very characteristic of me, extremely descriptive).
(6) But, however simple, banal, or nondescriptive they might be, machine-authored works like the article prepared by Quakebot are becoming indistinguishable from their human-authored counterparts.
Party chief Klement Gottwald intervened with the laconic but nondescriptive bohdc, or "rich man," which was unanimously adopted.
The limitations for the present study could be a small sample size and nondescriptive format.
The raters were instructed to nominate items for exclusion that were identical, closely related, or synonymous (e.g., "grimace" and "grimacing"), vague or nondescriptive (e.g., "altered expression"), and referring only to an emotion (e.g., "angry"), incorporated features of other items (e.g., "reluctant to smile" as an element of the item "inconsolable"), and only quantified the behavior in terms of time (e.g., "grimace for less than 50% of the time" and "long grimace > 50% of time").
Indeed, a noncategorizational (and so nondescriptive), attitude-expressive hypothesis about the relevant meanings best explains B-grade intuitions.