nondescript

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non·de·script

 (nŏn′dĭ-skrĭpt′)
adj.
Lacking distinctive qualities; having no individual character or form: "This expression gave temporary meaning to a set of features otherwise nondescript" (Katherine Anne Porter).

[non- + Latin dēscrīptus, past participle of dēscrībere, to describe; see describe.]

non′de·script′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nondescript

(ˈnɒndɪˌskrɪpt)
adj
lacking distinct or individual characteristics; having no outstanding features
n
a nondescript person or thing
[C17: from non- + Latin dēscriptus, past participle of dēscribere to copy, describe]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

non•de•script

(ˌnɒn dɪˈskrɪpt)

adj.
1. undistinguished or dull; without interest or character: a nondescript novel; nondescript clothes.
2. of no recognized or specific type or kind.
n.
3. a nondescript person or thing.
[1675–85; non- + Latin dēscrīptus, past participle of dēscrībere to describe, define, represent; see describe]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nondescript - a person is not easily classified and not very interesting
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
Adj.1.nondescript - lacking distinct or individual characteristics; dull and uninteresting; "women dressed in nondescript clothes"; "a nondescript novel"
ordinary - not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree; "ordinary everyday objects"; "ordinary decency"; "an ordinary day"; "an ordinary wine"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

nondescript

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
غَريب، غَيْر مألوف، لا يُمْكِن تَحْديدُه
nevýraznýnijaký
intetsigende
nehezen meghatározható
tilkomulítill, sem erfitt er aî lÿsa
neaprašomas
nenosakāma izskata-nenoteikts
kişiliksizsıradan

nondescript

[ˈnɒndɪskrɪpt] ADJ [person, clothes, face] (= unremarkable) → anodino; (= uninteresting) → insulso, soso; [building, furniture] → corriente; [colour] → indefinido
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nondescript

[ˈnɒndɪskrɪpt] adj [building, person, clothes, appearance] → quelconquenon-drinker [ˌnɒnˈdrɪŋkər] npersonne f qui ne boit pas d'alcoolnon-drip [ˌnɒnˈdrɪp] adj [paint] → qui ne coule pas
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nondescript

adj taste, colourunbestimmbar; person, appearanceunauffällig, unscheinbar (pej)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nondescript

[ˈnɒndɪˌskrɪpt] adj (person, clothes) → qualunque inv; (colour) → indefinito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

nondescript

(ˈnondiskript) adjective
having no noticeable, interesting or memorable characteristics. a nondescript sort of building.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Maria's mother most likely was not a slave (slavery was abolished in Curasao in 1863), her voicelessness and nondescriptness nonetheless point to the maintenance of the same social hierarchies of slavery and suggest a certain universalization of her character: through allegory, it is feasible to read Maria's mother as the representative of all Black women on the island; her universality is the cause for her silence and yet also the reason that the reader is supposed to know her story.
The settings are cheap apartments, sparely and haphazardly decorated--a table might be just a board on sawhorses; the characters are young people dressed with almost uniform nondescriptness (T-shirts, jeans, shapeless sweatclothes); and their discussions and conflicts are over commonplace situations of longing and jealousy.
The actors in Lindsay-Hogg's film version--now transferred to DVD--are, by contrast, letter-perfect in their lines, and their setting looks for all the world like a real, muddy dirt road with rocky berms on either side, the sort of desolate place whose utter nondescriptness might well seem artificial to a viewer with no memory of such forgettable roadsides all over Ireland.

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