nondevelopment


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nondevelopment

(ˌnɒndɪˈvɛləpmənt)
n
the lack of normal development
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nondevelopment - failure of normal development to occur
agenesia, agenesis - imperfect development; nondevelopment of a part
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
References in periodicals archive ?
In the water temperature experiment, the highest percentage of oocytes without a polar body (PB) occurred at 19[degrees]C, indicating delayed meiotic development, with a nondevelopment rate of 75.
prudent fiscal management, continued focus on enhancing revenues and reducing nondevelopment expenditure.
Eightyfive percent of the allocated amount was spent as nondevelopment expenditure of the Centre.
On the one hand, pre-Martinez case law defining "failed" for purposes of [section] 2254(e)(2) has stated that a prisoner fails if the nondevelopment of facts is due to a "lack of diligence or some greater fault, attributable to the prisoner or .
Government payrolls already support 70 percent of the Libyan workforce and together with other nondevelopment services consumes 77 cents from every dollar of Libya's oil revenue, leaving few funds for development or investment.
Myers said the company's long record of nondevelopment and delay had made a "mockery" of its obligations to the state as owner of the oil and gas estate.
Nondevelopment or late development of social skills can cause problems in child behavior (Elibol-Gultekin, 2008).
complicated problems, (53) of accommodating nondevelopment interests in
Today, this historically remarkable experiment in conflict prevention through mutual self-restraint and nondevelopment remains in place, where many countries conduct research in jointly occupied and accessible stations.
The repulsion hypothesis: On the nondevelopment of relationships.
The mounds of literature about foreign aid and economic growth, as pointed out by Carol Adelman and Nicholas Eberhardt in "Foreign Aid: What Works and What Doesn't" (American Enterprise Institute), show that "these state-to-state transfers inhibit competitiveness, create dependency, and absorb or misallocate political resources or energies in recipient countries: note that aid is motivated by nondevelopment donor and contractor interests; and prove that aid engenders a lack of feedback and accountability, encouraging host country graft and corruption.
The second treatise comes from the pen of Paul Collier, a lifetime expert on the nondevelopment of fifty-eight small countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa.