nonearning

nonearning

(nɒnˈɜːnɪŋ)
adj
1. (Banking & Finance) relating to an investment that does not offer a financial return
2. (Banking & Finance) relating to a person that does not earn an income
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In a single-income family, the nonearning spouse can be worried about being cheated by the earning spouse.
This is in line with the bank's strategy of paring nonearning assets.
Households with earnings are financially better off, with average total income at 81 percent of the poverty level, compared with 50 percent for nonearning households.
With the bank's sustained efforts to reduce nonearning assets, net gains from sale of foreclosed assets also grew significantly.
The figures in this table are computed using the entire sample, including earning as well as nonearning individuals.
Because cash is a nonearning asset and cash equivalents are usually low-yielding securities, the investment in such assets is kept at a safe minimum.
1989) (describing Oregon's "homemaker" provision as recognizing nonearning spouses' economic contributions); see also In re Marriage of Brown, 587 P.2d 361, 365 (Mont.
(83) The 1972 compensation structure of Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary began with a base salary, to which were added cost-of-living increases, various increments for seniority ($150 each year, for a maximum of twelve years), and other adjustments for dependents ($200 per year for each dependent child, elderly relative, or nonearning spouse), college subsidy (the lesser of $800 or three-fourths the remaining tuition after all other scholarships and aid each year), and responsibility ($500 each year for the president and $400 per year for the dean).
Its effect is positive, sizeable, and significant, suggesting that nonearning income is an important determinant of self-employment.
They did offer free checking as long as the CUs kept their nonearning balances with the banks.
No doubt, if something reduces any bank's cost of holding smaller cash reserves by making it cheaper for the bank to replenish dwindling reserves on short notice, then banks will hold smaller reserves and incur smaller foregone-earnings costs of holding nonearning reserves.
At Chrysler, for example, we got rid of $1 billion worth of nonearning assets and were able to do it because I wasn't worried about having to book a loss that would then affect the earnings per share that would then get criticism from shareholders.