noneconomist

noneconomist

(ˌnɒnɪˈkɒnəmɪst)
n
a person who is not an economist
References in periodicals archive ?
They believe that due to appointment of noneconomist to the post of finance minister, the country's economy had to face crisis and now they are hopeful for economic reforms from Khatiwada.
Trump broke with precedent in another way: He chose a noneconomist.
Although hyperinflation may appear to a noneconomist historian as a bolt from the blue, the underlying effects of hyperinflation begin mundanely.
Although the economic analysis is impressive, delving into optimality and equilibrium, it was a bit fatiguing for a noneconomist to wade through this discussion only to find the assessment that luxury's detriment to the economy is undetermined.
Even a noneconomist has to love his beautiful graphical presentations.
Rather, it is intended to assist the noneconomist (nonpractitioner) who wants to analyze and interpret patterns of economic activity at the macro level.
Anthony Bebbington (2004), himself one of the first noneconomist social scientists to support the adoption of the term, indicates that the communitarian approach was a compromise between those who wanted to frame social capital in a political economy approach and those who favored the institutional economics language.
Making the noneconomist uncomfortable, without quite saying so, appears to be part of the point.
Often, when noneconomist policy types talk about the rising economic influence of China or Russia, they prefer to discuss this phenomenon's ramifications for democracy or power politics or its offensiveness to political freedom.
That is the case because I place a very high value on the abilities that I know Hal has: he can separate the trivial from the important in selection of topics; he can be imaginative and rigorous in his use of data; he knows his economic theory and yet has not lost sense of the importance of returning to the real world; he understands the need to translate his findings to the noneconomist and the importance of inferring policy implications instead of standing paralyzed in the face of uncertainty.
While economists have made a lot of progress in recent years in understanding key issues like institutions, collective action, and politics, the vast majority of noneconomist social scientists (and indeed many economists) would argue that areas of social, cultural, and political action are best studied by the social sciences that specialize (and thus have a comparative advantage) in these topics--namely, anthropology, sociology, political science, and psychology.
They offer an excellent description of the concepts in layman's terms so a noneconomist can understand the process.