nonelite

nonelite

(ˌnɒnɪˈliːt)
adj
not elite
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, investigations have shown that while elite and nonelite performers do not differ between the intensity of symptoms experienced, elite performers report significantly more facilitative interpretations of symptoms associated with competitive anxiety that their nonelite counterparts (Jones, Hanton, & Swain, 1994; Jones & Swain, 1995; Perry & Williams, 1998).
Paradoxically, Linton's attempts to draw attention to nonelite figures creates the desire for more insight into the heretofore marginal players in the colonial arena.
I'd like to think," one woman said, "that Carolyn's work continues in our classrooms," that in the advising, teaching, in-house writing, and curriculum and program development that are the life of the professor in a nonelite institution a feminist agenda can obtain.
23) This ambiguity is reinforced by Jones's penchant for conflating nonelite and proletarian voices.
Playing a central role in Kittleson's rendering of this narrative of a briefly budding, but never in danger of flowering, democracy was popular pressure from "near-elite" and nonelite groups and individuals, including workers and slaves.
Fletcher, Manning, Palliser, Thirsk: see 130) have substantiated well-founded early-modern views of enclosures as positive actions, often initiated by nonelite groups and promoting efficient tillage without victimizing tenants or increasing vagrancy and crime.
The answers to these questions need to account for elite or intellectual discourses, as many scholars on multiple modernities seem to do (Wittrock, 2000), but also for lay discourses of nonelite and nonintellectual publics who are often excluded from both their domestic public spheres and scholarly research on those spheres.
A peppering of archival sources--principally Russian and British, and some Ottoman and French add dimension to his account, as does the integration of a wide strata of published memoirs and correspondence from elite and nonelite writers.
One facet of social status that deserved more attention in this well-informed book is that of nonelite Greek athletes.
Significantly, elite attitudes are no more consistent than those of nonelite respondents.
The great contribution of Common Whites is that it adds complexity and considerable richness of detail to our understanding of nonelite whites in the antebellum South.
Peasant entrepreneurs must therefore ration selective incentives: they reserve the expensive material incentives for mobilizing a few important elite participants and use the relatively costless selective incentives to mobilize the many nonelite participants.