nonending

nonending

(nɒnˈɛndɪŋ)
adj
not ending
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
This textual loop, a mise en abyme, turns the poem's ending, Roland's sudden arrival at the Dark Tower, into a nonending, what Ashton Nichols describes as "a unique circularity, whereby the closing words call for an endless retelling of the tale." (8)
As Lennon's time in the Running Back stable looks set to run, alongside a typically hectic tour diary and nonending stream of Cold Tonic releases to steer, a defined path has begun to emerge as Krystal Klear heads into a second decade of existence, something Lennon admits he struggled to be comfortable with in his early days.
We hear nonending and often incoherent excuses from the panicked offender who lacks the guts to admit a mistake and face the music.
The book is a nonending refrain of a Jamaica gone wrong in the aftermath of the "orderly transition" (p.
Nevertheless, in any comparison to be done, the amount of nonending paths for each of the compared approaches is a matter to be taken into account, as it could indicate that one of the used methods outperforms the other in the amount of completed trajectories, even though in completed ones the performance of the worst approach seems to be better.
Possibilities for discovering Today in History, What Happened on My Birthday, or 100 Years Ago Today resources are nonending. What is described here is only the tip of the proverbial iceberg, and it's certainly easier than turning the microfiche wheel.
But perhaps this "nonending" offers a better conclusion to Molly's story than the ideal union that readers and the Cornhill editor fantasized about.
As he looked through the book of photos of cats that we had provided haven for, his voice broke as he spoke of his wife and children's nonending grief for their pets.
We are also back to the consideration of why such iteration/reiteration should matter as something of a positive achievement, however qualified all of Creeley's beginnings and nonending endings tend to be.
McHale calls this case a "nonending," given the obvious position of the alternative paths in the text.