nonequilibrium


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nonequilibrium

(ˌnɒnˌiːkwɪˈlɪbrɪəm)
n
(Biology) biology a state in which the rate of increase is not equal to the rate of decrease
adj
relating to a lack of equilibrium
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Such hypothesis is not the first one to this field but there is some relevant contributions in quantum regime due to Trovato and Reggiani [23-26], in which they used quantum maximum entropy principle (QMEP) and dealt with closure problems by assuming that L-Multipliers could be expanded in powers of [h.sup.2]; h being the reduced Planck constant, in order to determine the reduced Wigner function [27] for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions.
E., "Nonequilibrium photocurrent modeling in resonant tunneling photodetectors," J.
One can now calculate the amount of nonequilibrium eutectic according to a model proposed by Brody and Flemings (B-F).The B-F equations may be used to calculate the composition of liquid during solidification, and the fraction of solid at which the eutectic forms.
(9.) Nonequilibrium dynamics complicate management of natural resources.
Jou, Temperature in nonequilibrium states: a review of open problems and current proposals, Rep.
The project has potential applications for a variety of fields, including smart materials, artificial muscle, understanding cytoskeletal mechanics and research into nonequilibrium physics, as well as DNA nanotechnology.
Both types of punishment, equilibrium and nonequilibrium, rely on reciprocity incentives.
Under the illumination in LTO, electrons were excited from valance band to conduction band by absorbing the photon energy and generated nonequilibrium carriers.
In this model the electric charge is not a special kind of matter: the electric charge only manifests the degree of the nonequilibrium state of physical vacuum; it is proportional to the momentum of physical vacuum in its motion along the contour of the vortical current tube.
He explains in the preface: "To understand the nonequilibrium order formation as a whole...one should intuitively feel and actually touch the phenomena, and then understand how they are analyzed from a scientific viewpoint." Six contributed chapters provide an introduction and discuss the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, dynamics of droplets, density oscillators, colloidal crystals, and basic observations and analysis of structural color in nature.