nonevaluative

nonevaluative

(ˌnɒnˈɪˌvæljʊətɪv)
adj
not evaluative or involving subjective judgement
References in periodicals archive ?
For descriptive ethics, objective, nonevaluative, neutral methods are, therefore, not a real option, (iii) Finally, and relatedly, one also has to join the first-person perspective of the normative philosopher with the third-person perspective of the sociological observer.
These include crucial areas such as providing and protecting time for staff development and collaboration, engaging with teachers in nonevaluative classroom visits and discussions, encouraging teacher leadership, and providing political cover for teachers who are trying out new teaching approaches.
students' performing experiences are nonevaluative and allow
50) Further, both Reasons Centrism and Reasons Basicness are silent on whether the property of being a reason is reducible to something nonnormative or nonevaluative, and on whether it is a natural or a nonnatural property.
Nonjudgment of Inner Experience (eight items) refers to taking a nonevaluative stance toward thoughts and feelings.
Therefore, although stereotype threat is activated in high-stakes testing or evaluative contexts and reduced in nonevaluative contexts (Walton & Spencer, 2009), the nature of IP as an emergent identity might allow IP to be present across contexts and, thus, may affect various domains in university life and student functioning.
Some scholars have recently expressed concern that mindfulness practice in MBIs has placed too much emphasis on nonevaluative aspects (Bodhi, 2011; Dreyfus, 2011).
To adopt a hermeneutic of tactical ecumenism requires a commitment to nonevaluative participation in ecumenical tactics, that is, an open and receptive taking-part-in collaboration that occurs between Christians of differing denominations.
tests, classes, homework) documenting the higher salience of emotions such as hope, anxiety, guilt, and hopelessness in evaluative settings, and of emotions such as enjoyment, relief, relaxation, and boredom in nonevaluative settings (Raccanello, Brondino, & De Bernardi, 2013).
Similarly, Barnett (1987) and Joyce and Showers (1980) have encouraged nonevaluative feedback among peers in coaching of leadership and teaching.
Information at many institutions was either very basic and nonevaluative (such as a course description in a course catalog) or limited to a few courses and instructors (such as those known by friends, other students, or personal experience).