nonevaluative

nonevaluative

(ˌnɒnˈɪˌvæljʊətɪv)
adj
not evaluative or involving subjective judgement
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike other staff who support reading (e.g., reading resource teachers), coaches generally don't work directly with students and, in most cases, serve in a nonevaluative, support role for teachers.
The discussions were designed to be nonevaluative. A regional office administrator and I alternated as facilitator and recorder for each session.
* Often, the relationship is mutually beneficial and nonevaluative, with all parties learning in a purposeful way through sharing knowledge and experiences.
The opportunity to work with Freiberg's PCLA gave student teachers the resources to look deeply into their classroom and teaching in a nonevaluative environment, from both their own perspective and that of their students.
Regardless of the method used, feedback should address specific behaviors and be nonevaluative in nature, providing an opportunity for improvement before high-stakes evaluations are completed.
Originally designed as an intervention to improve the novice teacher's relationships with her students, both the novice and mentor were hand selected and paired for the purpose of PD of the novice teacher through nonevaluative mentoring with a colleague.
described and, therefore, examined in a nonevaluative way.
They cannot be barely true; if two worlds differ in some value they must differ in some other, nonevaluative, way as well.
(93) Michael R Rhodes, Coercion: A Nonevaluative Approach (Rodopi, 2000) 100.
For descriptive ethics, objective, nonevaluative, neutral methods are, therefore, not a real option, (iii) Finally, and relatedly, one also has to join the first-person perspective of the normative philosopher with the third-person perspective of the sociological observer.
Many of the ideas described by leaders quoted in Leading for Literacy are reminders of work central to "just being a good leader." These include crucial areas such as providing and protecting time for staff development and collaboration, engaging with teachers in nonevaluative classroom visits and discussions, encouraging teacher leadership, and providing political cover for teachers who are trying out new teaching approaches.