nonfiction novel


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nonfiction novel

n.
A factual or historical narrative written in the form of a novel: Truman Capote's In Cold Blood is a nonfiction novel.
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Differently from other chapters, Clo's finds a good balance between theoretical discussion and analysis of the nonfiction novel Timira, which inspires and propels her theoretical reflections.
His novel A Hologram for the King (2012) was a finalist for the National Book Award, and What Is the What (2006), a nonfiction novel, was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award.
Brashear re-imagines the circumstances surrounding the murder, made famous by Truman Capote's award-winning nonfiction novel, In Cold Blood (1966).
Noviembre is, in fact, a truly powerful work in the tradition of the nonfiction novel genre.
Ross, as current New Yorker editor David Remnick reminds us in the foreword, virtually invented the "nonfiction novel," long before Truman Capote or Norman Mailer.
The crowded, makeshift, lawless swamp Boo captured in her nonfiction novel "Behind the Beautiful Forevers" looks positively idyllic in Rufus Norris' staging: sun-soaked, colorful and even, on occasion, bedecked with fairy lights.
(1) According to Capote, his volume exemplifies a new literary class, the nonfiction novel. "What I wanted to do," he explains, "was bring to journalism the technique of fiction" (Conversations 120).
Insufferable Indifference--The Mocking of America is a 'nonfiction novel' for adults, and represents the 'Deep Thoughts' of a 'Theoretical Deductionist' who now has more time to pursue his own interests, thanks to a permanent disability that keeps him at home pondering life, the universe and everything.
In books like this Mailer helped invent the nonfiction novel, and pioneered the introduction of novelistic devices and a subjective persona into journalism.
Flis acknowledges the "terminological inconsistencies" (2010: 1) surrounding this literary genre that have led writers and scholars to employ varying terms such as "nonfiction novel" or "faction", or to see these novels as works of historiographic metafiction or historical narratives (2010: 1-2).
In the tradition of Capote and O'Neill, Boardinghouse Stew is Eileen's nonfiction novel, originally released in the 1980s as a headline-grabbing stage play of the same name.
In communicating scientific fact to the non-specialist, there is a huge difference between simplifying for effect and misleading."[3] Before he began work on a book about the "very human drama" of the discovery of DNA's structure, Watson "saw in my future the writing of what Truman Capote would later call the 'nonfiction novel.'"[4] No doubt Watson learned something from Waugh's ability to heighten and transmute real-life originals, turning them into memorable fictional characters.