nongenetic

nongenetic

(ˌnɒndʒɪˈnɛtɪk)
adj
not geneticnot relating to genetic science
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Cortisol and estradiol: nongenetic factors for hyperhomocyst(e)inemia.
Nongenetic factors, however, also affected breast cancer risk.
We use a novel combination of experimental and statistical methods to estimate maternal effects on condition and clutch size in the collared flycatcher, where we define "condition" to be the nongenetic component of clutch size.
To control for nongenetic factors that might confound the results, the researchers factored in age, body mass and years of schooling (a measure of socioeconomic status).
infants have cytomegalovirus infection, which is the leading viral cause of mental retardation and the leading nongenetic cause of sensorineural deafness.
The potential influence of nongenetic factors (such as gender, chronic blood loss, regular blood donation, excessive iron intake, or other dietary modifiers that increase or decrease iron stores) on phenotype expression needs to be carefully evaluated.
An individual's susceptibility to environmentally mediated disease may arise from genetic causes or from nongenetic factors such as age, disease state, diet, or dietary supplementation.
CI is a phenomenon in which two conspecific, sympatric or allopatric, populations are reproductively incompatible due to cytoplasmic ("nongenetic") factors.
The findings provide the best evidence yet that nongenetic abnormalities exert an important influence on the development of schizophrenia, says Daniel R.
Of the remaining 19% of the variance attributable to nongenetic factors, 33.8% was accounted for by alcohol, 8.0% by smoking status, and just 2.4% by leisure time physical activity.
Barkley, a clinical psychologist at the University of Massachusetts at Worcester, wrote in an article in the September 1998 issue of Scientific American that nongenetic factors may account for 20-30% of ADHD cases among boys and a smaller, unspecified percentage among girls.
The term can be applied to methodologies directed at looking at inherited genetic diseases (in both symptomatic and presymptomatic stages of disease), at acquired diseases, or even at evaluating nongenetic diseases, e.g., the use of molecular genetic diagnostic techniques for identifying infectious disease agents.