nonheme

nonheme

(ˌnɒnˈhiːm)
adj
(Biochemistry) biochem relating to iron that does not form a porphyrin ring
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are two types of iron in foods: heme iron and nonheme iron.
A phylogenomic profile of hemerythrins, the nonheme diiron binding respiratory proteins.
Comment: Black tea (and, to a lesser extent, green tea) has been shown to inhibit nonheme iron absorption, but it has not been clear whether the timing of tea consumption relative to a meal influences iron bioavailability.
However, the form of iron (nonheme) in these plant-based foods is not well absorbed by our bodies.
[90] have reported that a CORM can have enhanced toxicity against nonclassical targets, that is, nonheme bacteria.
The authors have suggested that polyphenols deposited in muscle tissue may maintain the nonheme iron in reduced form, which lead to initiation of Fenton's reaction increasing the intensity of muscle lipids oxidation.
One of the primary functions of nitrite is to act against lipid oxidation by the binding of heme and to prevent the release of catalytic iron, the binding of heme and nonheme iron, and the inhibition of catalysis and stabilization of lipids against oxidation [7].
Pearson, "Metmyoglobin and nonheme iron as prooxidants in cooked meat," Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol.
Besides its role as antioxidant, VitC exerts a chelator activity; indeed, by reducing ferric to ferrous ([Fe.sup.+3] [right arrow] [Fe.sup.+2]) iron and by generating soluble iron complexes, VitC efficiently enhances the absorption of nonheme iron at the intestine level [14-17].
For example, consumption of polyphenols inhibits nonheme iron absorption and may lead to iron depletion [141].
FTO is located on chromosome 16 in humans and encodes a protein with a double-stranded b-helix fold, homologous to the members of the nonheme and 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase superfamily (which mainly impact the metabolism of fatty acid) [14].