nonhousing

nonhousing

(ˌnɒnˈhaʊzɪŋ)
adj
not concerned with or related to housing
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the prospects for the non-housing sectors are weaker, with public nonhousing output only picking up towards the end of the forecast period as Band B of the 21st ramps up.
For all but the most wealthy, we cap out-of-pocket spending on health care at 50 percent of income (a portion of which is financed from nonhousing wealth) and assume the rest is written off by providers or financed from outside of the household.
Despite the increase in outstanding debt, the trend of decline in its growth rate, which began in the second half of 2016, continues both in housing debt and in nonhousing debt.
The decision by the state Department of Land Conservation and Development opens up 969 acres of land near the Eugene Airport and along the River Road corridor for future nonhousing urban development.
Indeed, Desmond himself recognizes that one reason for the rise of the Eviction Economy is that there has been a reduction in support on the part of the federal and state governments for poor people in the form of both housing and nonhousing assistance (pp.
As examples, Schmeiser and Seligman (2013) recently used nonhousing assets as an objective measure of financial well-being; Davis et al.
This approach will assign nonprofit, nonhousing asset holdings across groups based on measured incomes, exacerbating any differences in actual wealth holdings.
The Impact of Demographics on Housing and Nonhousing Wealth in the United States.
Another source of leverage that many people were concerned about was the use of home equity loans to fund nonhousing consumption.
In the PSID, housing equity is reported every year, but nonhousing wealth is reported only in the 5-yearly wealth supplements from 1984, 1989, and 1994.
t] identical individuals at time t, each of whom derives utility from real nonhousing consumption ([cx.
While several recent articles on the 2007-09 recession and recovery have focused on the losses and gains experienced by different groups, including the young, the possible changes in household decisions to hold different types of nonhousing assets in recent years have received less attention.