nonjoiner

nonjoiner

(ˌnɒnˈdʒɔɪnə)
n
a person who does not join (an organization, etc)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Unicode standard, there are special characters used to control special entities such as zero-width joiner, nonjoiner, and special spaces (or white spaces).
I don't believe that the "nonjoiner" attitude is tied to financial status; nor do I believe it occurs because the association does not "meet their needs." I do believe, however, that this attitude toward joining a professional association is a reflection of today's professional culture.
Morris, a "confirmed nonjoiner," unswayed by the left or right, "accepted things" as he "found them." (24) He recalled the 1933 swastika in the snow as "another time I failed to read correctly." (25) Following Thoreau he resisted the Second World War as not "worth fighting and dying for," but to avoid the draft he volunteered for the Army and Navy and was rejected for medical reasons.
If associations are concerned about keeping pace with membership growth and participation, they will need to contend with groups like the allegedly nonjoiner Generation X, she says.
For Wilder's isolation from both mainstream currents--jazz and the European concert tradition--and his tenacious independence as a nonjoiner of any ideological camp inform the content and quality of the bulk of his musical output.
A skeptic and a nonjoiner, he sailed smoothly through the choppy seas of left sectarianism, representing anyone who came to him with a legitimate constitutional grievance.
Understanding who joins the association allows us to determine the minimum productivity level needed to stay in the industry because profit differs between association joiners and nonjoiners. If [L.sub.s] increases in x, high productivity firms join the association.
However, women and respondents in their twenties were, as expected, more likely to be nonjoiners, with the former approaching statistical significance.
Well-known libertarian defender of the state Tibor Machan proposes a state that somehow allows nonjoiners to remain outside it.
In terms of percentage points (rather than the percentage of the initial base rate), the increase in rates for joiners of any affiliation was the same as that for nonjoiners. Hospitals that left affiliations, on the other hand, often had initial procedure rates that were slightly lower than those of hospitals that remained in affiliations, but still experienced lower growth rates.
No difference was observed between the joiners and nonjoiners by number of children, hence multivariate analyses relate only to respondents who had children.
be members of professional associations; (3) nonjoiners simply chose not to