nonjusticiable


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nonjusticiable

(ˌnɒndʒʌˈstɪʃɪəbəl)
adj
(Law) law not capable of being determined by a court of law
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(67) The Supreme Court has always considered certain cases nonjusticiable because they fall within the doctrine, although the parameters of the doctrine have shifted over time.
Jubelirer, in 2004, the Court dismissed a challenge to partisan gerrymandering, and a plurality of four justices said that such suits are inherently nonjusticiable political questions.
Overturning a ruling of the Minnesota Court of Appeals which had set aside a Hennepin County District Court ruling, the tribunal held that the lawsuit did not present a "nonjusticiable" issue in determining whether the school systems complied with Article 13, 1 of the Minnesota State Constitution which requires a "general and uniform system" of public schools which will provide a "thorough and efficient system" for education in the state.
Trump administration attorneys insist that the case is "nonjusticiable," meaning that the courts are not the proper venue to resolve the issues in Juliana; even if this was not the case, they continue, the plaintiffs lack standing to sue.
Trump administration attorneys insist that the case is "nonjusticiable," meaning that the courts are not the proper venue to resolve the issues inJuliana even if this was not the case, they continue, the plaintiffs lack standing to sue.
"Moreover, this court's order may be reversed, either because the Supreme Court finds partisan gerrymandering to be nonjusticiable or because the Supreme Court approves a different test for partisan gerrymandering claims, which Maryland's map may or may not satisfy."
Nixon be overruled on the ground that the case was a nonjusticiable intrabranch dispute?
rejected for presenting nonjusticiable political questions (75) or for
Five out of nine justices ruled that the issue was nonjusticiable, with four of those five saying that the issue was a political question.
claims are nonjusticiable political questions, as four Justices in Vieth
(48) The Supreme Court named six elements that might make a case a nonjusticiable political question: