nonlinguistic


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nonlinguistic

(ˌnɒnlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪk)
adj
(Linguistics) not relating to or conveyed using language: nonlinguistic communication.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nonlinguistic - not consisting of or related to language; "depended on his nonlinguistic skills"
lingual, linguistic - consisting of or related to language; "linguistic behavior"; "a linguistic atlas"; "lingual diversity"
References in periodicals archive ?
Areas covered include note taking and note making, nonlinguistic representations, generating hypotheses, and using technology.
Something interesting about the Group-Driven Inquiry is that each participant has a responsibility to contribute to their blog or website in a unique manner (for example, the Graphic Designer is responsible for incorporating graphics and nonlinguistic interpretations into the website or blog).
Background: Nonlinguistic cognitive impairment has become an important issue for aphasic patients, but currently there are few neuropsychological cognitive assessment tests for it.
They investigate whether there can be nonlinguistic thinking and whether non-language-using animals can be said to think, and determine the limits of thought and thinking.
Recently, some studies (e.g., [5, 19,20]) tried to examine the cognitive deficit in aphasia; however, the question was largely unresolved because of the small number of subjects in the sample, the heterogeneity of clinical types of aphasia, and the need for verbal responses in most nonlinguistic cognitive tests.
(Greenberg) The brain is not uncommitted to the kind of grammar it is disclosed to: if disclosed to a syntax without circular criteria, the undertaking of the language routes reduces steadily in support of other routes that are usually associated with elucidating nonlinguistic issues.
Acknowledging the inadequacy of human language to approximate Ayahuasca-induced messages, even in the lush and visceral poetry inspired by the plant, Luna and White also unleash potent nonlinguistic art upon their audience.
Nadj's move to France was professionally motivated, linking him closer to Walcott than Barba, but Meerzon is interested in Nadj's attempt to archive "the memory, the feel, and the imagery of his homeland" in nonlinguistic forms (171).