nonlyric

nonlyric

(ˈnɒnˌlɪrɪk)
adj
(of poetry) not in a lyric style
References in periodicals archive ?
Mussorgsky showed his life-on-the-edge grittiness by use of an almost ugly melodic line, intense chromaticism, and a nonlyric approach to uniting words with music.
This design is embodied in the arrangement of the manuscript: first, in that the letters are not separated off in their own section, either at the beginning or the end, but instead intercalated in the middle of the sequence of poems; and, secondly, because that sequence itself begins with "A Letter from Artemiza in the Towne to Cloe in the Country," while the only other nonlyric poem it includes is also a verse letter, "Part of an Epistolary Essay from M: G to O: B upon their Mutuall poems.
Yu understands why innovative poets develop their non-narrative, nonlyric strategies, and he is remarkably attentive to how these strategies work in particular poems.
The second section, entitled "Accessory Texts," includes articles on nonlyric texts (Suzanne Fleischman) and on vidas and razos (Elizabeth W.
If the Expansivists wanted to invoke a historical precedent against the charge that metrical poetry is elitist, European, and conservative, they might go back to Langston Hughes, who also shared their interest in nonlyric modes, but who was politically on the left.
Whatever he may be in his nonlyric moments, in his longing for some lost perfection and in his willingness to consume himself in seeking what he knows to be beyond attainment, the lyric Byron is the quintessential Romantic.