nonlyric

nonlyric

(ˈnɒnˌlɪrɪk)
adj
(of poetry) not in a lyric style
References in periodicals archive ?
Naturally, and by its own nonlyric character, this declaration occurs while already aware that at the deepest level, all meaning, and all intention fade away, prioritising the outside, disorder and instability.
All of them feature a search for poeticity and a nonlyric poetic (socio-political) translation in the public space, from either the perspective of hermeneutical transition or cultural translation.
Mussorgsky showed his life-on-the-edge grittiness by use of an almost ugly melodic line, intense chromaticism, and a nonlyric approach to uniting words with music.
This design is embodied in the arrangement of the manuscript: first, in that the letters are not separated off in their own section, either at the beginning or the end, but instead intercalated in the middle of the sequence of poems; and, secondly, because that sequence itself begins with "A Letter from Artemiza in the Towne to Cloe in the Country," while the only other nonlyric poem it includes is also a verse letter, "Part of an Epistolary Essay from M: G to O: B upon their Mutuall poems." This design can confidently be attributed to the copyist, even though the leaves of the manuscript were "disbound" by one of its owners, since the texts regularly run across page divisions (a full calendar and foliation of the manuscript is provided in the Appendix).
Yu understands why innovative poets develop their non-narrative, nonlyric strategies, and he is remarkably attentive to how these strategies work in particular poems.
The second section, entitled "Accessory Texts," includes articles on nonlyric texts (Suzanne Fleischman) and on vidas and razos (Elizabeth W.
If the Expansivists wanted to invoke a historical precedent against the charge that metrical poetry is elitist, European, and conservative, they might go back to Langston Hughes, who also shared their interest in nonlyric modes, but who was politically on the left.
Whatever he may be in his nonlyric moments, in his longing for some lost perfection and in his willingness to consume himself in seeking what he knows to be beyond attainment, the lyric Byron is the quintessential Romantic.
Essays of a page or more introduce each chapter, and most seasons begin or end with a statistical paragraph, which summarizes the number of new shows, makes general comparisons with the nonlyric theater, and notes the successes and failures and relative quality of the year's efforts.