nonmanagement

nonmanagement

(ˌnɒnˈmænɪdʒmənt) or

nonmanagerial

adj
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) not involving or related to management
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
These types of political games are temptations that require immediate restraint, and both management and nonmanagement employees should challenge them immediately.
To convert the distribution of banks across the nonmanagement syndicate positions into a measure of status, I used Bonacich's (1987) c([Alpha], [Beta]) measure, one of the standard status measures for relational data.
This is a standard "general management" MBA with limited opportunity for specialization through electives; it is meant for those who may have a strong nonmanagement undergraduate degree (in engineering, for instance) and need new skills to enter the ranks of middle management or start their own business.
Among the Chinese respondents, 69.1% were senior managers, 27.2% middle managers, 3.2% supervisors, and 0.5% in nonmanagement positions.
This sweet deal on behalf of Joe and all nonexempt workers (nonmanagement public employees, all of whom are represented by unions) eventually was adopted by all school districts, county and city governments in Oregon.
The learning curve for these nonmanagement skills seems so steep, particularly for pathology trainees who may find the discipline so different from the history-taking and physical diagnosis skills emphasized in medical school, that the task becomes a consuming one, easily dwarfing other priorities like management or leadership skills.
Average Full-Time Nonmanagement Base Pay Increases (CUs With $1 million or more in assets) 2007 3.95% 2008 3.57% 2009 2.59% 2010 2.26% 2011 2.36% 2012 Budgeted 2.43% 2013 Anticipated 2.23% (CUs With $1 million or more in assets) Note: Table made from bar graph.
These responses were then categorized into upper management, middle management, or nonmanagement positions.
Therefore, it is important that future efforts to assess journal quality pay attention to nonmanagement disciplines to provide proper recognition for their contributions so that management scholars are informed on the most likely sources of additional knowledge, as well as additional opportunities for the publication of their work.
One of the surprising findings of the NBES was that managers, especially senior managers, were out of touch with how nonmanagement employees perceived their adherence to ethical behaviors.