nonmedical

nonmedical

(ˌnɒnˈmɛdɪkəl)
adj
not of, relating to, or using medical theory or practice
References in periodicals archive ?
She was an only child and is selfish at times, and self-centered, making many nonmedical dietary demands and acting as she pleases when here.
The researchers found that 11 percent of high school seniors reported past-year nonmedical use of prescription drugs, and a substantial proportion of them obtained the prescription drugs from multiple sources (44.2 percent).
"When comparing the overall effect of use after versus before medical marijuana laws were passed, we found small increases in nonmedical use of prescription opioids and slight decreases or no change in prescription opioid use disorder among nonmedical users of prescription opioids -- even for states that allowed dispensaries," said study first author Dr.
Nonmedical prescription drug use is a common cause of emergency department (ED) visits in the United States for medication-related harm, but data on effects of nonmedical use of pharmaceuticals are limited.
"Prior studies have shown that, after OxyContin became more difficult to abuse, some nonmedical users of OxyContin switched to heroin (a pharmacologically similar opiate)," they noted.
Eight states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis use for adults for nonmedical purposes, and another 22 have legalized it for medical purposes only.
In one study, nearly 13 percent of high school seniors reported nonmedical use of prescription opioids.
The leaders of the Jewish communities of four Nordic countries said that a bill proposing to ban nonmedical circumcision in Iceland "will guarantee" that no Jewish community is established there.
This guide helps clinicians, as well as family members, friends, and nonmedical professionals, understand eating disorders and their care and complications.
Many cancer patients add nonmedical therapies to the treatments prescribed by their oncologists.
New research from the CVS Health Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University provides evidence that automated algorithms --or complex calculations --in electronic medical and pharmacy claims data may be useful in screening large populations for nonmedical opioid use as well as identifying those providers who may be writing fraudulent prescriptions.
In the winter of 2013, Philip Schmidt said, some of his relatives required a nonmedical home service but he couldn't find "good, dependable, quality care."