nonmetropolitan

nonmetropolitan

(ˌnɒnˌmɛtrəˈpɒlɪtən) or

nonmetro

adj
not metropolitan; rural or semi-rural
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References in periodicals archive ?
During 2015-2017, death rates attributed to excessive cold or hypothermia increased steadily with age among those aged [greater than or equal to] 15 years in both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan counties.
The counties were classified as rural, nonmetropolitan, and metropolitan.
In "Labor market outcomes in metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas: signs of growing disparities" (FEDS Notes, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, September 25, 2017), Alison Weingarden examines employment characteristics for working-age adults, some with no more than a high school education and others with at least some college, in metropolitan areas and nonmetropolitan areas from 1997 to 2017.
While many rural employees are not covered by private pensions, government provides 20% of earnings in nonmetropolitan areas, compared with 16% in metropolitan areas (USDA, 2016a; USDC-BEA, 2016).
PERSONAL INCOME grew faster in the metropolitan portion of the United States (2.5 percent) than in the nonmetropolitan portion (1.0 percent) in 2016.
But the economic politics of nonmetropolitan decline should have presented the Democrats with a significant opportunity.
The percentage of all children aged 10-17 years who did not receive a well-child checkup is down since 2008, but there is a considerable gap between those living in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported.
In analyzing more than 5,800 cold-related deaths between 2010 and 2013, researchers found that the cold-related death rate in nonmetropolitan areas of the West was 20.5 deaths per 1 million people, compared to rates from 4.5 to 7.8 deaths per 1 million in other nonmetropolitan regions.
The data are compiled based on surveys of employers in all industries in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas in all states and the District of Columbia.
After this data from the 1970s, the following decade saw North American metropolitan areas gaining more population than nonmetropolitan areas.
Such a shift could help mitigate the disparity in growth rates between metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas that has limited the growth potential of community banks, the study notes.