nonmilitant

nonmilitant

(ˌnɒnˈmɪlɪtənt)
adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) politics avoiding or opposing aggressive action in support of a political or social cause
2. avoiding confrontation or violence
References in periodicals archive ?
Curator of Urban Community History at the Museum of Liverpool, Kay Jones, said: "These significant objects are a chilling reminder, primarily of the suffragettes' struggle, but also demonstrate the important role that women (militant and nonmilitant) from all backgrounds in Liverpool played in the fight for their basic right to vote."
How 1970s nonmilitant and apolitical Argentine middle-class citizens thought and felt about the increasing political violence shaking the country and how they remember it are the subjects of this engaging and thought-provoking book.
In northern Syria, clashes raged around the flashpoint town of Marea as Daesh pressed an assault on nonmilitant rebels.
Proclaiming one's homosexuality was inconceivable for them, while for the writers of succeeding generations it seemed that the inherent risks of "coming out" were less than those of the "closet." Robert Pinget's silence also comes from more personal motives, notably his religious education, his discretion, and his nonmilitant outlook.
Formed in 1903 by six women, including Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst, the WSPU was a splinter group of the larger constitutional and nonmilitant NUWSS.
Washington's nonmilitant, essentially separatist, precepts long after W.
These preachers, by radicalising various layers of the society, will ignite it - so these groups and their activities should be put under the counterterrorism [microscope] rather than ignoring them as nonpolitical and nonmilitant preachers," The Christian Science Monitor quoted Arif Jamal, author of "Shadow War: The Untold Story of Jihad in Kashmir," as saying.
Parvus preached revolution in the Sachsische Arbeiterzeitung, castigating "opportunists," "reformists," and all other forms of nonmilitant evolutionary optimism.
They have presented the writings in operative magazines either as militant and nonliterary (Voice of Industry) or as nonmilitant and bourgeois, attempting to be literary yet ultimately imitative and conventional (Lowell Offering).
It is a central paradox of militancy that as an organisation constitutes itself as a unified body it tends to become closed to the outside, to the nonmilitant, those who would be the basis of any mass movement.
The massive loss of union density during the 1980s and the more gradual decline afterwards were the products of a nonmilitant labour leadership committed to top-down rule and an ideology favourable towards capitalist accumulation.
Belton's experiences at Stowe University contribute to the development of his vehemently nonmilitant, nonviolent stance.