nonmoney

nonmoney

(ˌnɒnˈmʌnɪ)
adj
not involving money
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, individuals with nonmoney priming were found to spend less time finishing a difficult task than were people primed by more money (Vohs et al., 2006), and they exhibited more moral behavior (Gino & Pierce, 2009).
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1945), table 16, "Summary of average money and nonmoney income and outlay," page 92 for money income receipts ($2,409 for urban) and personal tax payments ($37 for urban).
Mutual aid, a central point for Reclus and Kropotkin which strongly interested Febvre, is now stressed as a factor in 'informal economies' by economic geographers like Richard White (2009), who argues that it could serve as an example for the generalization of nonmoney economies.
The nonmoney upsides my team and I identified have three elements.
Rest assured that ratepayers' money is not being used to line the pockets of those entering the "No Limit Texas Hold 'em" at the casino - it's a nonmoney competition.
In addition to these reasons, available consumption data are better suited than available income data for imputing some nonmoney resources, particularly those related to housing and vehicle ownership.
(Per capita means per person.) Includes money and nonmoney income, such as benefits and government assistance.
(2) The required information for nonmoney contributions (Treas.
Actor Shalini Vatsa, who impressed all as Natha's wife Dhaniya in Peepli [Live] and who is a JNU alumni, puts it succinctly: "JNU used to be a nonmoney, non-criminal campus.
I may arrange to withdraw my wealth on demand, if and when the funds are available or in various money and nonmoney forms.
Because money, as such, has no intrinsic value and because it is nearly costless to produce (printing paper), there is no economic reason for economizing on usage, as would be the ease if money were defined in terms of a designated commodity, which has nonmoney use value and which requires resources to produce.