nonmusician

nonmusician

(ˌnɒnmjuːˈzɪʃən)
n
a person who is not a musician
References in periodicals archive ?
They performed pure-tone audiometry along with an interview with professional musicians and at control group composed by nonmusician soldiers.
The accordionist played the tie-up notation, while 50 of her nonmusician friends, with an hour's instruction, performed another piece of weaving notation, the thread count, on violins that Bocanegra rented for the occasion.
Pinheiro and colleagues compared musicians and nonmusician healthy controls when they listened to sentences with two conditions: sematic content (neutral versus happy versus angry) and pure prosody.
The band were signed and dropped by two record labels - again, receiving money for doing nothing - and, after bass player Glen Matlock was dumped and nonmusician Sid Vicious brought in to replace him, the writing was on the wall.
Musicians children detect pitch violations in both music and language better than nonmusician children: behavioral and electricophysiologycal approaches.
(20) However, among British Army musicians with 8 to 12 years of military service, the risk of developing hearing loss did not appear to be any greater than their nonmusician counterparts.
In the ensuing decades, as computers and electronic music became more entwined, the roles of composer, performer, and programmer would not only further coalesce but frequently be assumed by a nonmusician. Cybernetic Serendipity Music doesn't particularly point in this direction (although Schmidt concluded his note in a 1967 ICA bulletin for "A Painter's Use of Sound" by asking, "Is it too much to hope that a complete ignorance of musical theory may be some curious advantage?").
In other words, compared to their nonmusician cotwin, musicians playing an instrument in older adulthood had a 64% lower likelihood of developing dementia or cognitive impairment.
Instruction includes music basics so that even a nonmusician or non reader can become fluent in reading and performing notation accurately with practice.
Although both musicians teach at conservatories, their concerts are meant to please the lay listener or nonmusician, said Smith, who has mentioned in previous interviews that he gets pleasure out of seeing the recognition on the faces of audience members.
Sadly, though, she calls her reliability into question right away when she declares that Shostakovich's "own voice" cannot be heard "in even the best of his symphonies" a surprisingly sweeping assessment from a nonmusician who conceded a page earlier that she has listened only to "most" of the composer's 15 symphonies.