nonmystical

nonmystical

(ˌnɒnˈmɪstɪkəl)
adj
not mystical
References in periodicals archive ?
Something poured into me, and I poured out into it." As a rationally and scientifically minded person, I would be quick to point out that this so-called mystical experience can be reduced to certain electrochemical reactions in the brain that can be explained by any number of naturalistic and completely nonmystical causes.
In the Middle Ages, Jewish theology gained an explicit, though often apologetic, role, under the challenges of Christians, and yielded both a mystical and nonmystical branch.
The reader of this essay should keep in mind Kramer's assertion of the remarkable kinship between Eliot's timeless moments and Buber's nonmystical view of redemption in assessing the questions that I raise in the Postscript that follows.
This recent summary reports that in the applied literature intuition is most often defined to be: a personality trait; an unconscious process; a set of explicit, observable, nonmystical actions used to define problems; the result of distilled experience; or a paranormal power (Behling & Eckel, 1991).
as the author of comparatively descriptive and scientific, nonmystical, and non-pugnacious essays, and through Emerson's representation of him as 'the bachelor of thought and nature.'" (12)
Such a realistically grounded world is presumed today by multitudes of Western-trained people around the globe, including most of the nonmystical members of the Western, monotheistic religions.
As the spiritual books and groups claiming a place for quantum theory and modern physics within their worldview proliferate, the nonmystical mainstreams of the Western monotheisms are increasingly affected.
Ramban, thus, provides an alternate, nonmystical rendering.
In nonmystical thinking, the circumstances under which "yes" applies are held to be not the same as those under which one would say "no." The realities in these cases are held to be different, and further, irreconcilable.
The complex whole, in a completely nonmystical sense, can often exhibit collective properties, 'emergent' features that are lawful in their own right (Kauffman [1995], pp.
Although no thematic study of the role of fear in the Interior Castle has been undertaken, it seems to me that Teresa's frequent allusions to fear, both in the initial, nonmystical Mansions, as well as in the later, supernatural ones, force the following question upon the reader: Does her treatment of fear provide critical insight regarding the soul's progression through the mystical castle of its interior life?(14) As I have stated, the central question of mysticism concerns the possibility of mediation.
$45 In this clearly written and interesting work Stoeber proposes the comprehensive thesis that a theodicy drawing upon the mystics offers a more coherent and cogent response to the challenge of evil than do traditional nonmystical theodicies.