nonnaval

nonnaval

(ˌnɒnˈneɪvəl)
adj
not belonging or relating to the navy
References in periodicals archive ?
WAGOR = (W)AGOR, with W indicating a nonnaval designation and AGOR signifying an oceanographic research ship.
China has also made use of its nonnaval maritime forces--essentially coast guard equivalents--to enhance its agenda.
As it stands, the book merely ends with Canada, the last country addressed in part five, "Regional Trends: Promise or Peril?" Given the authoritative qualifications of the contributors, there is a lot of nonnaval information presented for a wider audience.
Any response of rents and home prices also depends on the response of nonnaval people living in the area.
It will be, for the most part, nonlethal and nonnaval. The Russian Baltic Sea Fleet will have a role, but for the most part it will be as a threatening over-the-horizon presence tasked with dissuading NATO from interfering; what it will not do is engage NATO naval forces in pitched battle.
Generally, the degree of sea control depends on the size of the ocean/ sea area; distances to the operating area from one's basing/deployment area; and relative numerical/qualitative naval strength (plus in some cases nonnaval forces) compared with the enemy forces.
Another advantage of the weaker force is that sometimes it may be able to seize and maintain sea control of a strait and its approaches with nonnaval forces alone.
Maritime history in the United States has four distinct audiences, each of which requires different approaches, levels of understanding, and vantage points: Congress and other government leaders, including uniformed members of the nonnaval services; the men and women of the U.S.
Finally, in the littoral, there are few places where a warship does not stand out, whereas defenders are afforded a multitude of opportunities to hide their forces, whether geographically or through deception, basing them on nonnaval platforms.
Four contexts dominate: domestic (resource), foreign, military, and (nonnaval) maritime.
Nonetheless, consideration of the foreign and the (nonnaval) maritime (see below) contexts of the twenty-first century reduces confidence in the "golden age" argument.