nonnecessity

nonnecessity

(ˌnɒnnəˈsɛsɪtɪ)
n
an absence of necessity; the state of being unnecessary
References in periodicals archive ?
The Walker-Thomas Furniture Company, the court appeared to suggest, should have refrained from allowing someone so financially constrained, and with seven dependents, to enter into such an unfavorable arrangement, particularly for a nonnecessity such as a stereo.
Empirical evidence has confirmed the nonnecessity of such limits in most ordinary cases.
Taking advantage of the space opened up by the historicism of postmodernity, theology should rearticulate the Christian metanarrative in a way that demonstrates the nonnecessity of presuming an ontology of violence, defending esthetically a Christian-narrated practice of peace that persuades people "for reasons of 'literary taste'" that Christianity has the better story.
Unlike some who feel the rising cost of gas may force people to cut back on nonnecessity items, Berkowitz predicts they will continue to buy supplements, and he adds there's a good chance shoppers may be more inclined to purchase them in supermarkets to avoid an extra trip to another store.
The terms used to describe White privilege such as invisible, unmarked, and unnamed suggest that there is a denial or perceived nonnecessity to define whiteness.
Kasting, "The Nonnecessity of Euthanasia," in Physician-Assisted Death, ed.
Example 3 in Section IV proves nonnecessity, with a case of imperfect information in which |V.
1967) (relying on a 1929 precedent for entitlement to an instruction on the privilege of nonnecessity of retreat), overruled by Conner v.