nonnutritive

nonnutritive

(ˌnɒnˈnjuːtrɪtɪv)
adj
not providing nourishment, not promoting nutrition
References in periodicals archive ?
Consumption of diet beverages or nonnutritive sweeteners increases with age and is especially common among women with higher levels of education and income.
Newer nonnutritive sweeteners such as aspartame (Equal) and sucralose (Splenda) eroded market share.
In addition, nonnutritive sweeteners have been proposed as a possible trigger for food addiction because their intake is associated with increased preference and cravings for sweet foods, and weight gain (43).
Studies to investigate nonnutritive sucking and oral stimulation intervention, aiming at shortening the period of hospital stay by improving the oral feeding ability, should be conducted.
Sweeteners are nutritive and nonnutritive. Fructose is a monosaccharide present in honey and fruit, and when linked with glucose, it forms the natural disaccharide sucrose.
Pica is defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as the persistent habit of eating nonnutritive substances lasting for over a month; it should be severe enough to warrant clinical assessment [1].
At this time, six artificial sweeteners also known as "nonnutritive" and "high-intensity" sweeteners have received FDA approval.
The effects of nonnutritive sucking and oral support on the feeding efficiency of preterm infants.
Emerging data indicate that artificial, or nonnutritive, sweeteners may have negative effects on metabolism, gut bacteria and appetite, although the evidence is conflicting.
An individual's craving, mouthing, or consumption of materials that are fundamentally nonnutritive is described as pica.
Furthermore, pacifiers can be used to stimulate nonnutritive sucking in preterm newborns (PNs) with or without musical sounds (Poore et al.