nonoperative

nonoperative

(ˌnɒnˈɒpərətɪv)
adj
not involving an operation
References in periodicals archive ?
In any case, it is good to have moved firmly into an era where first-line treatment options almost always involve nonoperative management of injuries even as debilitating as meniscal tears.
Co-author Dr Moin Khan, of McMaster University, Canada, said: "Surgery in the middle-aged with mild or no osteoarthritis may have little effect compared to nonoperative options."
Most of the hepatic injuries are relatively minor and heal spontaneously with nonoperative treatment which consists of observation arteriography and emboliza- tion.12
He details the classification and terminology of these anomalies, and vascular tumors and malformations and their clinical features, etiopathogenesis, differential diagnosis, imaging studies, and operative and nonoperative management, with a separate chapter on primary lymphedema.
Nonoperative treatment for four to six weeks is usually effective in 70% of the affected patients [4, 5].
Major clinical skills on management of liver trauma depend on patient selection for initial nonoperative management, identification of patients who require delayed surgery after trial of nonoperative management and intraoperative decision making between definitive repair of the injury and a damage control strategy7,8.
Marlboro Hospital, in partnership with UMass Memorial Medical Center, has again expanded its musculoskeletal services with the opening of a new Spine Center at the hospital, and will offer minimally invasive care and injection therapy for patients with pain and nonoperative issues.
In every nonoperative trteatment of clubfeet it is mandatory to use foot abduction brace correctly of proper type and timing, without FAB relase rate would be very high.
Patients who refused surgical therapy or who were poor candidates for transoral or open surgery were offered nonoperative therapy (22 patients).
"A number of common ailments seen by podiatrists can often be successfully treated with nonoperative strategies.
The severity of pancreatic trauma is primarily dependent on the associated injuries and secondarily related to main pancreatic duct injury responsible for complications: pancreatitis, pancreatic fistula and pancreatic pseudocysts.3 At present, treatment of pancreatic trauma-related complications often requires a combination of endoscopic, interventional and surgical approaches.6 Generally, in the absence of main pancreatic duct lesions, nonoperative treatment is advocated.7 Traditionally, severe pancreatic trauma involving disruption of the main pancreatic duct usually requires operative management.8
described the successful nonoperative treatment of a 4 x 3 cm biloculated cerebellar abscess in a five year-old child.