nonorthodox

nonorthodox

(nɒnˈɔːθəˌdɒks)
adj
not conforming with established or accepted standards, as in religion, behaviour, or attitudes
References in periodicals archive ?
In Eastern liberatory traditions, in particular orthodox and nonorthodox Hindu philosophy, he found comparable evidence to what he termed individuation, the central process of human development and the spiritual evolution of the personality.
In Nigeria, as indeed in many developing countries, a combination of poor education, poverty, and a high percentage of nonorthodox healing practices among the populace contribute to late presentation of breast cancer in many hospitals with consequent high occurrence of metastatic disease and poor disease survival [6].
Heterodox theologians are precisely those who "relativize" orthodoxy (as opposed to explicitly rejecting it as heretical theologians would) and thus "open the door" for nonorthodox readings of Scripture.
Emphasizing the differences between the West and Islam in terms of freedom of speech, he states that although there is not a structure like the church in Islam, Islam is not very successful in tolerating nonOrthodox ideas.
Sheldrake's theories are nonorthodox yet testable, insofar as the criterion of the scientific status of a theory is its testability.
(19) Likewise, the re-establishment of the boran (old or traditional style of practice) movement in 1989 and its reliance on 'nonorthodox' practices and rituals (20) reflects a continuity with Brahmanic beliefs and spirit cults in Cambodian Buddhism in the precolonial and colonial periods.
During and after the Cultural Revolution, when national politics allowed local cadres more freedom to mobilize their political support, they showed no hesitation to do so openly and their involvement in the local nonorthodox businesses was in full swing.
Nonorthodox sperm DNA configurations in the form of detectable DNA breaks in the sperm can have a double nature: 1) damage produced after sperm chromatin remodelling for histone-protamine replacement, and 2) damage produced by external or environmental causal agents.
This type of study was not ah apologetic attempt for dogmatic debates with non-Muslims or with "nonorthodox" sects.
How does the latter look from the vantage point of indigenous people who practiced a fundamentally different way of approaching the sacred, which was noninstitutional, nonorthodox, and captured in such phrases as "our way of doing things"?
First, as the scholarship of Carol Lansing, Susan Taylor Snyder, and other historians has revealed, what was true of early modern Europe was also true of the Middle Ages, namely, that the interactions between orthodox Christian and the nonorthodox (heretics as well as infidels) were far more ambiguous and complicated that has been suspected.
As the geopolitical situation turned in Muscovy's favor, military and religious changes in the former Khanate resulted in an increasingly aggressive stance against local accommodations with the nonOrthodox populations.