nonpassive

nonpassive

(ˌnɒnˈpæsɪv)
adj
not passive; active
References in periodicals archive ?
* Was the XYZ Partnership a passive or nonpassive activity?
* Assets producing both passive and nonpassive income during a taxable year must be treated as being partly passive and partly nonpassive in proportion to the respective amounts of each type of income produced by the asset.
The major cause of loss of prosthetic restorations on implants, bone loss of the ridge, fracture, or mobility of implants is nonpassive casting [21].
For the performed analysis, the concept of relative passivity index, which is applicable for both passive and nonpassive systems, is addressed and modified to a lower number by the use of appropriate feedback or feed-forward compensators.
In both years, the company claimed deductions for repairs and maintenance, taxes and licenses, depreciation, and "other deductions." It allocated 100% of the profits and losses to Cooke, who reported the losses as nonpassive on Schedule E, Supplemental Income and Loss, of his income tax return and deducted them against other nonpassive income.
A special allowance for real-estate rental activities with active participation permits a loss against nonpassive income of up to $25,000, which phases out when modified adjusted gross income is between $100K and $150K.
Binary logistic regressions show an odd of 1.6 higher risk of overweight with 95 % CI: 1.0-2.7 in nonpassive smokers compared to passive smokers.
Seneviratne, "Bilateral shared autonomous systems with passive and nonpassive input forces under time varying delay," ISA Transactions, vol.
(2000), decreases as (nonpassive) institutional ownership increases.
In 2012, the Fayetteville office of the IRS determined that the couple's income from real estate activities for tax years 2009 and 2010 should be reclassified from nonpassive income to passive income, resulting in additional taxes and interest owed--$69,851 for 2009 and $52,291 for 2010, according to Holmes' order.
However, because investment in real estate is generally a passive activity, such losses may normally offset only other passive income of the taxpayer, although passive losses and the deduction-equivalent of credits with respect to certain rental real estate activities may offset up to $25,000 of nonpassive income of an individual.
Provided the taxpayer satisfies one of the seven tests, the activity will be considered nonpassive or "active." For purposes of the material participation tests, any work performed in a taxpayer's capacity as an investor will not count as "active" participation unless the taxpayer is directly involved in the day-to-day management or operations of the activity.