nonperformer

non·per·form·ing

 (nŏn′pər-fôr′mĭng)
adj.
1. Performing poorly or unsatisfactorily: nonperforming schools.
2. Failing to produce income: a bank with many nonperforming loans.

non′per·for′mance n.
non′per·form′er n.

nonperformer

(ˌnɒnpəˈfɔːmə)
n
a person who does not perform (on stage, etc)a person who does not perform to an expected level
References in periodicals archive ?
(190) Such nonperformance preserves the nonperformer's right to vote while leaving the other parties to perform under the terms of the agreement and cast ballots for the nonperformer's candidate of choice--not her own.
She said the only owners of the company are artists, though she said they "are contemplating and in discussions'' about adding nonperformer owners.
nonperformer when it offers only the latter." Similarly, none of
lose its status as a nonbroadcaster, and thus a 'nonperformer'
**The employer needs to confidentially replace a nonperformer.
Some managers will jump to let someone go before he or she has a chance to improve; some will exhaust every probable (and improbable) action to try to bring the person up to par; and others will leave a nonperformer in place for so long that the virus spreads to other employees.
The other side of this coin, presumably, is that a nonperformer should be held in breach of contract only if the breach was willful, opportunistic, or perhaps negligent, but in any event in some way wrongful.
(French audiences still have a nose for neglected American gems" Jim Jarmusch's Broken Flowers, a relative nonperformer stateside, spent two weeks atop the French box office.)
Bob knew that, contrary to some leadership theories, firing a disruptive nonperformer could be a sign of enlightened leadership rather than a failure if the firing helped the overall performance of the department.
Called "spring-loading," the goal was to have the acquired company seem to be a nonperformer in terms of earnings, much below its actual performance.
This is not to say that a nonperformer cannot teach, but I believe that most would agree that if the same nonperformer were actively performing, his or her teaching would be at a higher level." Mark Clinton from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln agrees: "While some might question my priorities (putting practicing before any other facet of my 'job'), I think that this has had an extremely positive effect on my students.