provider

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pro·vid·er

 (prə-vī′dər)
n.
1. One who supplies a means of subsistence: parents who were good providers.
2. One that makes something, such as a service, available: primary health care providers.

pro•vid•er

(prəˈvaɪ dər)

n.
1. a person or thing that provides.
2. a person who supports a family or another person.
[1515–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.provider - someone whose business is to supply a particular service or commodityprovider - someone whose business is to supply a particular service or commodity
black marketeer - someone who engages illegally in trade in scarce or controlled commodities
bourgeois, businessperson - a capitalist who engages in industrial commercial enterprise
caterer - someone who provides food and service (as for a party)
connection - a supplier (especially of narcotics)
dispenser - a person who dispenses
distributer, distributor - someone who markets merchandise
purveyor - someone who supplies provisions (especially food)
recruiter - someone who supplies members or employees
stockist - one (as a retailer or distributor) that stocks goods
provisioner, sutler, victualer, victualler - a supplier of victuals or supplies to an army
2.provider - someone who provides the means for subsistence
benefactor, helper - a person who helps people or institutions (especially with financial help)

provider

noun
1. supplier, giver, source, donor, benefactor Japan is the largest provider of foreign aid in the world.
2. breadwinner, supporter, earner, mainstay, wage earner A husband's job is to be a good provider.
Translations
poskytovatel
tuottaja
fournisseurfornitore

provider

[prəˈvaɪdəʳ] Nproveedor(a) m/f

provider

[prəˈvaɪdər] n
[goods, services] → fournisseur m
internet provider → fournisseur d'accès service provider
(in family)soutien m (de famille)
sole provider
She is the sole provider for her family → Elle est seule à pourvoir aux besoins de sa famille.

provider

n
(Econ) → Lieferant(in) m(f)
(Internet) → Provider m, → Anbieter m
(for family) → Ernährer(in) m(f)

pro·vid·er

n. proveedor-a, abastecedor-a.

provider

n proveedor -ra mf; health care — profesional mf sanitario, proveedor -ra mf de salud
References in periodicals archive ?
Rural practices also staff nonphysician clinicians (NPs and PAs) more frequently--nearly 70 percent of these practices have at least one nonphysician provider.
In the fee schedule final rule, CMS expands its definition of nonphysician provider to mean physician assistant, nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, certified nurse-midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker.
The APRN receives a dollar amount for every 5% above the median MGMA nonphysician provider RVU benchmark in her or his area of specialty.
physician or nonphysician provider during the month of July 1994.
The practices range in size from 5 to 148 physicians and employ one nonphysician provider for every four physicians, on average.
Behavior changes for a prepubertal child with a motivated family can be explained in depth by a nurse or other nonphysician provider in a follow-up visit.
Dial and colleagues (1995) also reported that most HMOs did not have formal methods for estimating nonphysician provider staffing needs.
Although a nonphysician provider can be defined as any nonphysician who provides care to a patient in the place of a physician,9 for the purposes of this discussion, the term will be used specifically for advance practice registered nurses (APRNs) and physician assistants.
A nurse or other nonphysician provider can convey some information or provide materials to the patient about the treatment or procedure toward the goal of obtaining informed consent, but, again, it is you who must then come in and complete the discussion.
Provider claims files were used to identify services provided by p hysicians and nonphysician providers (AMA 1995), the specialty of the physician or type of nonphysician provider who provided each service, and the charge for each service.
The statistical significance of the covariance term (rho) indicates that a substitution to cheaper nonphysician provider types affects the demand for both specialist and nonspecialist physician providers.
An AHP will be charged with establishing a local policy-making body that includes consumers, physicians, and nonphysician provider inputs.