nonpoint


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non·point

 (nŏn′point′)
adj.
Not found or located at a single, definable point, as pollution whose source cannot be ascertained.

nonpoint

(ˌnɒnˈpɔɪnt)
adj
not originating from a single point or location
References in periodicals archive ?
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has awarded $1,041,000 to the Montana Department of Environmental Quality (MTDEQ) to help protect human health and the environment through a Nonpoint Source Program (NPS) Clean Water Act Section 319 grant.
Moreover, the WOTUS rule fails to address pollution from nonpoint sources and ongoing farming activity.
Agriculture, though, has been exempted from many of the regulations and permit requirements, mostly due to the concept of nonpoint source pollution.
While both state and federal laws established comprehensive programs to control discharge of pollutants into waters, the Florida Legislature found that many water bodies are still in need of restoration, and "better coordination" is needed to control point sources of pollution, such as industrial and wastewater facilities and nonpoint sources of pollution.
Nonpoint's brand of metal has a melodic edge to it: The edges are just as sharp as one would expect from the genre, but there's a way in which the pieces of the songs snap together with surprising fluidity.
(10) Other nonpoint sources include stormwater runoff carrying lawn fertilizers and pet waste, (11) and atmospheric deposition, much of it from vehicle exhaust and coal- and oil-burning power plant emissions.
With rapid economic development in recent years, increasing pollution from point and nonpoint sources has led to considerable degradation of water resources.
A number of legal and policy innovations are underway to address nonpoint sources.
(2) Nonpoint source pollution on the other hand does not fall under the discharge permitting system.
Point and nonpoint sources | Regulatory authorities grant National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for a subset of discharge sources, commonly called "point sources." Most often these are industrial and municipal wastewater treatment facilities, but NPDES permitting has been extended in recent years to include some confined-animal feeding operations and some areas of storm water runoff.
What is "nonpoint source pollution?" How much of a problem is it and how can it be controlled?