nonpolarizable

nonpolarizable

or

nonpolarisable

adj
1. (General Physics) not able to be polarized
2. (Chemistry) not able to be polarized
References in periodicals archive ?
Osteoid-like substance and dystrophic calcifications resembling bone formation were noted in one specimen (Figures 3(b) and 3(c)), and several giant cells were found to surround nonpolarizable foreign material (Figure 3(d)).
Thanks to the ohmic contact of nonpolarizable electrodes, the ionic resistance is measured in DC, allowing great simplicity in the readout circuit.
Histology revealed benign bone, bone marrow, cartilage, and adjacent fibroconnective tissue, as well as collections of nonpolarizable foreign material ("Kryptonite" adhesive).
The crystals are basophilic or violet on hematoxylin-eosin stain (H&E), are magenta on periodic acid-Schiff special staining with diastase, are nonpolarizable, and have a rectangular shape, resembling broken glass (Figure 5, A).
The crystals are basophilic or violet on hematoxylin-eosin stain; they are nonpolarizable; they have a rectangular shape; and they resemble broken glass.
A personal computer (PC), two copper plates that supplied electricity, two small Ag|AgCl nonpolarizable electrodes, and a solid high-resistance cylinder (outer diameter: 5 cm) were also used.
Normal nonpolarizable electrodes create electrochemical noise when the electrodes come into mutual contact, which is extremely unfavourable when observing the weak IEF signals within ocean currents [21].
The resistivity of the subsurface formation is measured using four electrodes, two metal bars for passing current into the ground (current electrodes) and two nonpolarizable porous pots for potential variation measurements (potential electrodes).
According to its Lewis acidity classification [61], [Al.sup.3+] belongs in Class A, a small (hard) metal ion with low polarizability (deformability), preferentially forming ionic complexes with similar nonpolarizable ligands, particularly oxygen donors such as oxyanions of carbon, phosphorus, and sulfur--all of which are plentiful in living organisms--giving Al the potential to wreak havoc in living systems.
Groenhof, "Evaluating nonpolarizable nucleic acid force fields: a systematic comparison of the nucleobases hydration free energies and chloroform-to-water partition coefficients," Journal of Computational Chemistry, vol.
The preceding examples involve nonpolarizable systems in potential fields.