nonrational


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nonrational

(nɒnˈræʃənəl)
adj
not in accordance with the principles of logic or reason
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nonrational - not based on reason; "there is a great deal that is nonrational in modern culture"
irrational - not consistent with or using reason; "irrational fears"; "irrational animals"
2.nonrational - obtained through intuition rather than from reasoning or observation
illogical, unlogical - lacking in correct logical relation
References in periodicals archive ?
The right hemisphere is for nonverbal, intuitive, creative and nonrational (not irrational) thinking.
A large portion of the general public's objections are in this category--a nonrational sense of disgust at the idea of buying and selling human body parts.
Plato and Aristotle thought that the soul has a rational and nonrational part, and that Socrates wrongly overlooked the nonrational part.
A second type of evidence for the nonrational character of the failurists' attachment to government shows up in the way they evaluate policies.
27]) and the result on nonrational centers of log canonical pairs due to Alexeev-Hacon (see [1]), which can be obtained in the framework of [3].
The solution to discomfort arising from the fact that Islam is a religion is not to pretend that Islam is not a religion, but to recognize and accept the fact that religion as such is inherently irrational and potentially murderous because it posits a nonrational means of knowledge.
These range from the difficulty in all wars of predicting what the political result of using force might be to the possibility that nonrational psychological and cultural mind-sets may blind leaders to what actually motivates them.
On the correlative account of epistemology, both morality and religion involve nonrational beliefs, and practical reason is reduced to its instrumental service toward ends humans are left merely to decide or posit.
Nonrational, emotional elements are extremely effective in the process of public activity (Popescu, 2014) and in generating results and efficiency in public agencies.
The category of the nonrational is central to what Smith terms a "historical poetics of justice" (218n1O).
Three pivotal ideas, reflected in recent Catholic literature, will be presented: a cultural understanding of racism; a reframing of the task of racial reconciliation; and the role of lament (and the importance of the nonrational in Catholic ethical reflection) in achieving racial justice.