nonresidence


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non·res·i·dent

 (nŏn-rĕz′ĭ-dənt, -dĕnt′)
adj.
1. Not living in a particular place: nonresident students who commute to classes.
2. Owned by, applying to, or characteristic of a person who is not a resident of a particular place: nonresident property; a nonresident fishing license.

non·res′i·dence, non·res′i·den·cy n.
non·res′i·dent n.
References in periodicals archive ?
735, 746-47 (1973) ("The proportion of the census population too young to vote or disqualified by alienage or nonresidence varies substantially among the States and among localities within the States.").
[because her] noncitizenship and nonresidence are grounds of ineligibility for a member of the Senate, thus, a member can be disqualified to continue as senator on these grounds.
On the patchiness of records and the award of these degrees in conjunction with a clerical posting and dispensation for nonresidence, see S.
By the French Revolution, many laity can be found decrying monastic complacency and episcopal nonresidence, but defending their cherished priests.
We also conceptualized father nonresidence as a risk, hence we expected stronger negative associations between depressive symptoms and father involvement when fathers were nonresident.
Lamb further elaborates on the effects of paternal nonresidence (in emotional terms as well) and he maintains that father-absence is harmful not because a sex role model is absent, but because crucial paternal roles are inadequately filled (for example, by a dominant mother).
Indeed, to put it more strongly, the nonresidence of emotions is what makes them 'binding'" (119).
During the period of nonresidence, the taxpayer would not be taxed by the United States on non-U.S.
at 472 ("The mere fact of nonresidence should not foreclose a producer in one State from access to markets in other States." (citing H.P.
Burglary by location (residence or nonresidence) and time of day (night, day, or unknown).