nonreusable

nonreusable

(ˌnɒnriːˈjuːzəbəl)
adj
not capable of being reused
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Manuel Zubiri pointed out that 80 percent of plastic wastes that pollute the soil, waterways and shorelines in the urban areas are the nonreusable or single-use plastic bags, while only 20 percent consist of plastic used as original packaging for goods or products.
That means material contaminated with nonreusable trash that makes using the otherwise clean recyclable material more costly and less efficient in the manufacturing process.
This process is full of nonreusable, undefined calculations with little capability for version control (that is, a consistent master copy).
The World Health Organization noted that the lack of medication and nonreusable medical supplies such as bandages is undermining the ability to give the flood of patients proper care.
Note that the needed low-cost components make this approach highly interesting for nonreusable vehicles such as ballistic rockets.
They are expensive, compared to cloth pads, nonreusable, and not very environment-friendly.
The walnut industry is fortunate to generate very little nonreusable waste.
Pledge to (http://www.earthday.org/limit-meat-consumption/) eat less meat , (http://www.earthday.org/stop-using-disposable-plastic/) stop using nonreusable plastic or (http://www.earthday.org/reduce-footprint-take-ecological-footprint-quiz/) reduce your carbon footprint.
After purchasing a bulk amount of drugs, Precision Dose sealed them in nonreusable single-dose containers and sold them.
Laboratory equipment was decontaminated immediately after use and all nonreusable equipment was autoclaved before disposal.
However, this experimental approach has several disadvantages, in which ballistic tests typically require many expanding tube samples and connected structures, which are also damaged during the test and are nonreusable. The experimental method is also not flexible for design change and is expensive and time consuming.
The results presented in this paper show that the incorporation in cement-based materials of rubber aggregates, obtained from waste tires, can be a suitable solution for some engineering manufactures, simultaneously offering an opportunity to recycle nonreusable tires.