nonrival

nonrival

(ˌnɒnˈraɪvəl)
adj
(Economics) economics (of goods or resources) capable of being enjoyed or consumed by many consumers simultaneously and therefore without rivalry, eg cable television
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References in periodicals archive ?
Congestible public goods are those whose consumption is neither completely rival nor nonrival; one person using a beach does not preclude others from doing so, but most people find crowded beaches less enjoyable than deserted ones (see Cornes and Sandier, 1986).
Because of the nonrival nature of information, prevailing economic theory would suggest that we are as likely to lose as to gain productivity from this technological change" [1].
Public goods are goods that are nonrival in consumption -- once the good is provided, the additional resource cost of another person consuming the good is zero.(202) The classic public good is the lighthouse.(203) One ship's "consumption" of a lighthouse's light does not diminish the ability of a second ship to use the same light.(204)
So in a world of nonrival commodities, we could expect monopoly to become the rule rather than the exception.
Livestock-free public lands is a nonexclusive and nonrival use, implying that livestock-free public lands is a public good.
Note that a key assumption of endogenous growth models is that technology is a nonrival, partially excludable resource in the production process (Romer, 1994).
While we focus on the VTTH industry, our analysis applies in general to information service industries that are characterized by the following features: (1) programming is a nonrival input, similar to a public good, and (2) the value consumers place on subscriptions to or use of the system is increasing in the amount and quality of the programming.
There are two heterogeneous communities within the economy defined by their fixed exogenous characteristics (nonrival amenities, zoning ordinances, and public services per household other than public school quality).
Analysts relying on the theory of public goods will, as ever, have to ascertain whether the conditions of nonexcludability and nonrival consumption are adequately met.
Public goods models maintain that most protest is about a public good (that is, one that is nonrival and nonexcludable).
Their consumption is nonrival, in that the use of one more radio receiver does not reduce the quality of signals to others, and nonexclusive, in that anyone with a frequency tuner can receive them.
Use of ideas are nonrival, yet some people can be excluded from an idea when it is not shared and instead remains private.