nonroyal

nonroyal

(ˌnɒnˈrɔɪəl)
adj
not royal
n
a person who is not a member of a royal family
References in periodicals archive ?
But the requirements of becoming a royal sort of eased up when the future king George VI asked his father, King George V, to marry a nonroyal. The nonroyal bride was Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, who would later be known as the Queen Mother.
The most fundamental distinction lay between royal courts and nonroyal courts.
Britain's tradition of nonroyal dukes was created for service to the monarch.
ROEHRIG, Catharine, "Woman's Work: Some Occupations of Nonroyal Women as Depicted in Ancient Egyptian Art", en Anne K.
Thus by renouncing the formal attributes of monarchy, and bestowing them on nonroyal individuals, Ivan and Peter paradoxically reinforced their own authority as genuine and authentic tsars.
The head of the organization was removed and replaced by Adel bin Khalifa Al Fadhil, a nonroyal.
In the first verse, Sisupala attributes Yuddhiqhira's irrational selection of Krsna to simple affection (preman, 15.14); in the second, he observes that for the nonroyal Krsna to receive a regal honor is like allowing a dog to lick the sacrificial offering (15.15).
Because she comes from an ordinary middle-class family in the ordinary English town of Bucklebury, she could be the first British Queen of nonroyal blood.
At the same time, he meticulously regulated the production and dissemination of artworks associated with his reign, prohibiting nonroyal manufactories from using gilt or gold thread, for instance, and ensuring that only his own cadre of artists could make engravings of Versailles's splendors--depictions that, as he well knew, were imitated throughout Europe.
Shakespeare, Heywood, Drayton, Marlowe, Legge, Fletcher, Peele, Munday, Wilson, Hathway, Dekker, Webster, Rowley, Drue, Davenport, Ford, and unknown playwrights revealed the Tower's instability as a royal symbol and represented it as an emblem of nonroyal English identity (Tower, 1-2).
Disney originally identified Mulan and Pocahontas as "nonroyal Disney heroines," but insisted by 2005 that they had always been part of the princess line (Bruce 8, 19).
The pronoun "you" is plural in Hebrew, addressed to Solomon and his nonroyal contemporaries as well as their descendants.