nonruminant


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nonruminant

(ˌnɒnˈruːmɪnənt)
adj
(Zoology) not a ruminant
n
(Animals) an animal that is not a ruminant
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nonruminant - not ruminant
ruminant - related to or characteristic of animals of the suborder Ruminantia or any other animal that chews a cud; "ruminant mammals"
References in periodicals archive ?
28, 2018); see also POLLAN, supra note 90, at 76-78 ("[T]he rules still permit feedlots to feed nonruminant animal protein to ruminants.
Some saponins reduce therefore the feed intake and growth rate of nonruminant animals (Das et al., 2012).
1985: A nutritional explanation for body-size patterns of ruminant and nonruminant herbivores.
Two new barley varieties are good for growers, the environment, and nonruminant animals.
Being a nonruminant animal, chickens tend to use, without significant changes, the lipids and the fatty acids present in a diet in order to fulfil its physiological needs for growth and muscle development [1].
Cowieson, "Board-invited review: opportunities and challenges in using exogenous enzymes to improve nonruminant animal production," Journal of Animal Science, vol.
The elephant under the order of Proboscidea is a nonruminant herbivore, belonging to the family with two living genera and species of elephants, Elephas maximus, of Southern Asia and Loxodonta africana, of Africa (Nowak, 1999).
Feed processing that combines shear forces, heat, residence time, and water may result in partial protein denaturation (13) and may result in changes in protein and other nutrient availability to a nonruminant animal.
On the other hand and as recently reviewed [3], several studies have shown that supplemental sodium selenite and sodium selenate by oral or parenteral administration forestall the clinical signs of Se deficiency and animal losses in ruminant and nonruminant species [14, 15].
The amount of TFAs in the meat of nonruminant animals is generally low [17] and is dependent on the presence of TFAS in the feeds.
Infected grain may contain fungus-produced toxic substances called mycotoxins (vomitoxin), which may cause vomiting in nonruminant animals and humans.