nonstationary

nonstationary

(ˌnɒnˈsteɪʃənərɪ)
adj
1. not stationary; in motion
2. (Mathematics) maths (of a random process in probability theory) of which the probability distribution alters with alterations in time or space
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Movement causes acceleration that produces deflection in the nonstationary electrode.
The finished goods inventory time series is a nonstationary process.
If these variables are nonstationary and have the same order of integration, they can be constructed into a cointegration model.
Since these data are nonstationary, cointegration is the superior econometric method to capture both the long-run and short-run movements in the variables.
In addition, the commodity basket for CPI and PPI includes nontradable goods, which impart a nonstationary component to real CPI or PPI exchange rates (Engel 1999).
Chapter 7 describes simulation of random fields, followed by Chapter 8 on nonstationary covariance.
A number of studies by eminent scholars using data for industrialized economies, in particular the United States and the United Kingdom, have shown that the inflation rate can be treated as a nonstationary variable in empirical applications [Baba et al., 1988; King et al., 1991; Johansen, 1992, Ericsson and Irons, 1994; Evans and Lewis, 1995; Crowder and Hoffman, 1996; Ericsson et al., 1998; Crowder and Wohar, 1999; Hendry, 2000; Ng and Perron, 2001; Rapach, 2002].
EEG signals are, usually, nonstationary and change abruptly in a short period, which leads to the change of frequency characteristics.
ENSO and cholera: a nonstationary link related to climate change?
First, the author argues that, contrary to what is often believed, there are many reasons why hours could be nonstationary in those models, while preserving the property of balanced growth.