nonstrategic nuclear forces

nonstrategic nuclear forces

Those nuclear-capable forces located in an operational area with a capability to employ nuclear weapons by land, sea, or air forces against opposing forces, supporting installations, or facilities. Such forces may be employed, when authorized by competent authority, to support operations that contribute to the accomplishment of the commander's mission within the theater of operations.
References in periodicals archive ?
If US-Russia nuclear arms control negotiations again become feasible, then nonstrategic nuclear forces also must be included.
The asymmetry in US and Russian nonstrategic nuclear forces does (or does not) matter.
4310, Section 1037) indicates that it is the sense of Congress that "the United States should pursue negotiations with the Russian Federation aimed at the reduction of Russian deployed and nondeployed nonstrategic nuclear forces.
4310, Section 1037), Congress again indicated that it believes "the United States should pursue negotiations with the Russian Federation aimed at the reduction of Russian deployed and nondeployed nonstrategic nuclear forces.
Throughout the Cold War, the United States often altered the size and structure of its nonstrategic nuclear forces in response to changing capabilities and changing threat assessments.
excluding entirely any constraints on nonstrategic nuclear forces where Russia enjoys a staggering advantage.
Russia's widely deployed nonstrategic nuclear forces pose a significant "loose nuke" threat, even as Russian nuclear doctrine lowers the nuclear threshold by relying on these as warfighting tools to offset imbalances in conventional forces relative to both NATO and China.
The United States has also unilaterally eliminated 90 percent of its nonstrategic nuclear forces, and Russia has moved to remove thousands of its own tactical nuclear forces.
This absence of detail not only leads to occasional disputes about whether Russia has complied with its PNI obligations, but also makes it very difficult for either side to predict the future size or structure of the other's nonstrategic nuclear forces.
land-based and sea-based nonstrategic nuclear forces from deployment regardless of whether the Soviet Union did the same.
The Role of Strategic and Nonstrategic Nuclear Forces in Extended Deterrence
The importance of maintaining US nonstrategic nuclear forces in Europe was highlighted in a 2008 report by the Secretary of Defense Task Force on DoD Nuclear Weapons Management, which noted,