nonsuccess

nonsuccess

(ˌnɒnsəkˈsɛs)
n
a lack of success; failure
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Inglethorp is out, and he sits down to write to his accomplice, who, he fears, may be in a panic at the nonsuccess of their plan.
Internet-of-Things technology enables advancements of health monitoring systems, but absent information is an endemic concern, because input collection may be disturbed occasionally in continuing intensive care settings, producing unpredictable and insufficient information and as a consequence resulting in nonsuccess in decision making.
(4) Additionally, FL study has suffered from a "legacy of nonsuccess" (Osborne 4) (5) as many learners fail to reach significant levels of communicative competence despite years of FL study in high school and college.
These nonsuccess stories are among the arguments cited against 4Ps.
"Nonsuccess in the first math course tends to be the reason why students drop out of STEM majors and don't graduate," Reddy says.
Students' nonsuccess was due to academic dismissal from the nursing program as a result of failing two or more courses.
From building patterns of discipline to replicate successful approaches and differentiate them from repeated negative choices to understanding how one's belief system "determines how you define success or nonsuccess", Bridging to Joy is for any who would take the next big steps in life and understand the kinds of changes intrinsic to a life of happiness.
(17) This approach seems justifiable despite the nonsuccess of the bond, since, for example, Blake et al.
Since in this study our success criterion was medal success, a few equal or stronger competitors are sufficient to cause nonsuccess. Our results moderately support theories regarding the promotion of junior elite sports that suggest an early start of training and exclusiveness.
While not looking specifically at age but at drop rates within online courses, Diaz (2000) argued that the high drop rates found within online courses do not necessarily indicate academic nonsuccess. Rather, Diaz argues that high drop rates may indicate better strategic movements on the part of more advanced, older and more experienced online students that his research found to be the online student's demographic profile.