nonsupervisory

nonsupervisory

(ˌnɒnˌsuːpəˈvaɪzərɪ)
adj
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) not supervisory
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Average hourly earnings for 13.4 million nonsupervisory retail workers surged 5.1% last year for the biggest advance since 1981, according to the U.S.
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, hourly earnings of production and nonsupervisory workers in the U.S.
* In 2017, hourly and nonsupervisory textile mill workers on average earned 136% more than clothing store workers ($646 per week vs.
In fact, average hourly wages adjusted for inflation actually fell from 2017 to 2018 for the bulk of blue-collar workers, including those in manufacturing and construction jobs and nonsupervisory workers in industries such as health care and fast food, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
While there are numerous variations among companies in the composition of their internal tribunals, the favored type appears to be a tribunal whose members include both management personnel and one or more nonsupervisory employees.
And the email should be sent by a nonsupervisory employee so that no one feels pressured to donate.
It states that anger about work will be more frequent among workers in the middle of supervisory hierarchies than among nonsupervisory workers, and that anger will decrease as supervisory level increases from the middle to the top of work hierarchies.
# % Change Sector Employees From a Year Age Agents and Brokers 776,200 [up arrow] 1.41 Health Insurers 547,900 [up arrow] 3.89 Property/Casualty Insurers 527,600 [up arrow] 2.11 Life Insurers 334,900 [up arrow] 2.23 Third-Party Administrators 176,800 [up arrow] 0.68 Title Insurers 89,900 [up arrow] 4.78 Claims Adjusters 57,000 [down arrow] 0.52 Reinsurers 25,200 [up arrow] 0.40 Average Earnings Average weekly earnings for the industry's nonsupervisory positions increased In four of seven sectors from July 2015 to July 2016.
As evidence of a strong correlation between wage growth and the quit rate, the authors cite correlations between the quit rate and the wage component of the Employment Compensation Index (ECI) as well as the growth in average hourly earnings of production and nonsupervisory workers.
Average weekly hours for construction craft workers and other "production and nonsupervisory employees" rose to 39.9 hours, the highest June level since data collection began in 1947.